• Categories
  • Archives

Brazil: Indians Give up Land for Fear


Brazil: Indians Give up Land for Fear

Close to 1000 farmers turned up at a protest armed and saying
that they were ready to use force
to throw the Kayapó off their
land. Some days afterwards a bridge was set on fire. The
Brazilian
Minister of Justice, however, claims not to know
anything about any threats made against the Kayapó.

by:

Cimi

 

The regional Funai (National Indigenous Foundation) administrator in Colíder, Megaron Txukarramãe, has reported
that the Kayapó indigenous people have been put under pressure and have suffered death threats to make them accept a
reduction of 307,000 hectares in the Baú indigenous land, located near to the city of Novo Progresso in the south of Pará.

The chief of the Baú reservation, Bep-Y, who has led the indigenous people in the negotiations, confirmed the claim
made by Megaron. "We have suffered many threats. That is why we prefer to give up ground in the negotiations so that we
may live in peace," he said.

As an example of this pressure, on September 17 around 1000 farmers occupied the Santarém-Cuiabá Highway to
protest against the demarcation of the indigenous people’s land. Demonstrators turned up at the protest armed and saying that
they were ready to use force to throw the Kayapó off their land. Some days after the protest, a bridge on the road from Baú to
Novo Progresso was set on fire.

The Minister of Justice, through his special advisor for indigenous affairs, Cláudio Beirão, claims not to know
anything about any threats made against the Kayapó. The president of Funai, Márcio Gomes, could not be found to comment on
this issue. His advisor, Roberto Lustosa, said that he knew nothing of the threats.

Meanwhile, Megaron, who accompanied the negotiations, says he has alerted Funai about the tense situation, "as
well as the press (which reported the fact), I have also come to Brasília and told the President of Funai about the threats,"
said the administrator of the official indigenous people’s organization.

The deputy Zé Geraldo of the Workers’ Party of Pará State, who acted as intermediary on the side of the farmers in
the talks with the Ministry of Justice and Funai, considers the negotiations concerning the Baú land as positive, and they
could even be able to be used as a peaceful template for speeding up other demarcation processes in areas where there are still
conflicts. "There is such a large wave of invasions taking place in that region, that Incra and Ibama are completely losing control.
This is why I believe that negotiations of this type could be the solution," the deputy stated.

The 6th Coordination and Review Chamber – Indigenous Communities and Minorities – of the Federal Public
Prosecution Office is preparing a lawsuit to repeal the government order that reduces the area of the indigenous land. In the opinion
of Ella Wiecko, public prosecutor at the
6th Chamber, this deal must be considered null and void as it was imposed by one
of the parties, "what took place was not a negotiation, as the proposal was imposed on the indigenous people."

Human Rights Caravan

Mid October the House of Deputies’ Human Rights Caravan was in the Caramuru-Catarina-Paraguassu area
belonging to the Pataxó Hã-Hã-Hãe indigenous people, in the municipality of Pau Brasil, around 560 kilometers from Salvador.
The aim of the visit was to see in loco the constantly publicized violent situation that confronts the Pataxó Hã-Hã-Hãe
people in their fight to regain their territory.

The Caravan visited the Mundo Novo region, where they could see the wretched conditions suffered by several
indigenous families who have been living under plastic sheets since they were violently thrown off their lands, when their
houses were destroyed and burnt by gunmen and farmers on July 12.

At 6 p.m. the entourage returned to the city, where a public meeting was held in the square in front of the Municipal
Chamber. During the public meeting the chiefs Gerson Melo, Marilene and Nailton Muniz spoke of the violence that the Pataxó
Hã-Hã-Hãe people have been suffering over recent years. They spoke of the disrespect, prejudice, persecution, and death of
their leaders. A report and a large dossier describing their situation were handed to the deputies in the Caravan.

Haroldo Heleno from the Indianist Missionary Council spoke in the name of the support groups, emphasizing that
peace is the fruit of justice. "There will be no peace for the Pataxó Hã-Hã-Hãe whilst they are not returned to their lands. The
indigenous people want no more than their land back", he said.

At the end of the meeting, the Caravan presented some guiding proposals. The deputies undertook to present a report
of the visit to the Minister Nelson Jobim and the other ministers of the Federal Supreme Court, requesting urgency in
judgment of the Annulment Suit; setting up a meeting with the National Public Security Department to ask for steps to be taken to
bring an end to the violent situation which is, nowadays, to be found in the municipality of Pau Brasil, as well as meeting the
president of Funai, in an attempt to speed up the actions that can answer the demands made by the indigenous communities during
the meeting. The Commission pledged to keep a close watch on any events that may once again harm the indigenous
communities.

Several leaders accompanied the Caravan’s visit: the Pataxó from the far south, the Tupinambá from Olivença and
Belmonte, as well as institutions that support the indigenous peoples’ cause and state deputies.

The Caravan has already visited the Xavante people in Mato Grosso, the Cinta Larga people in Rondônia; and the
Macuxi people in the Raposa/Serra do Sol region of Roraima. They also visited the Xukuru people, in Pernambuco, and the
Kaingang and Guarani people, in Santa Catarina.

 

Cimi is Brazil’s Indianist Missionary Council, an organization linked to CNBB, National Conference of
Brazilian Bishops. You can get in touch with them by sending an email to
cimi@embratel.net.br

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

From Brazil: Thanks for Iraq, Mr. Bush

For having stanched the flow of innocent blood in Iraq—with a reduced number of ...

Brazil’s Rich-Poor Gap Shrinks and So Does Everyone’s Income

The latest numbers from the IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics) show that ...

Brazil’s Most Innovative Physicists Join Colleagues from Around the World in Morocco

The students at Escola Crescimento (Portuguese for Growth School), in the city of São ...

Brazil Bid to Host World Cup Is Rich in Rhetoric and Poor in Cash

Brazil has officially made public its intention of hosting the 2014 World Cup, 64 ...

Brazil’s WSF Splits for Anti-Liberal Planetary Fight

Next year’s World Social Forum (WSF), which is now taking place in Brazil, will ...

Without Fishing Tradition Brazil Gets Brand New Fisheries Ministry

Brazil's President, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, signed July 29, in the city of ...

Inflation in Brazil Hits Lowest Level Ever

Brazilian and Latin American stocks retreated, as investors cashed in some of the region’s ...

In Brazil, Media Still Lives as when the Generals Ruled the Country

Reporters Without Borders has recently released a report entitled “Brazil, the country of 30 ...

Brazil Industry Enters Brazil-Uruguay Dispute over Itaipu Hydroelectric Plant

At the heart of a debate this Wednesday, May 27, between Brazil's main industrial ...

Song of Jilted Love

Waiter By Rodolfo Espinoza A composer, who for more than three decades has been ...