Por aí

Brazilian heartbreaker
First this 27-year-old beauty was chosen to host the TV show “Billboard Music World 95,” then she had a chance
to do a special called a “Day in Hollywood.” Now Patrícia Mário from Fox network is getting her own weekly
program with interviews and music clips that will be called “Oye.” What even her fans don’t know is that Patrícia is a
Paulistana, that is, she was born in São Paulo, Brazil. Her Latin pretty face and body have been gracing Miami’s magazine pages, billboards and TV sets, as a model advertising products, since she was 15. For some time she also presented a program on the Spanish-speaking Telemundo channel.

Patrícia has a dream: to go work in Brazil in a novela (soap opera). “If Globo network invited me I would go like
that,” she says, concluding with a lament: “Nobody has called me though.”

 


Musical summer
A musical tribute to Brazilian composer Moacir Santos will be the headline of the Brazilian Summer Festival `96
to be held in Los Angeles on July 6 and 7. In its third incarnation the annual show has been transformed from a
one-day spectacle into a two-day musical affair. On Saturday, “A Day in Rio de Janeiro” there will be presentations by
Rique Pantoja and his quintet, singer Cláudia Villela, and Josias & Sambrasil. On Sunday, Pantoja will be back and will
share the stage with Meia Noite & the Midnight Drums and Lula & Afro-Brazil. The Brazilian Nites Production party to
be held at the John Anson Ford Amphitheater will run from 5 PM to 10 PM on both days. For tickets call (213) 466-1767.

 


Native sounds
Mixing Brazilian rhythms with jazz, New-York-based saxophone trail-blazer Ivo Perelman is releasing
Tapeba Songs, the third album in his trilogy of Brazilian-inspired melodies. The No Problem Productions’s CD is a journey to
little-known sacred songs of the Tapeba people from northeastern Brazil. José Eduardo Nazário (percussion), Lelo
Nazário (keyboards) and Paulo Bellinati (guitar) are the Brazilian musicians who play with Perelman. Among the tracks:
“Biju” (a baião-like song), “Sara Mussara” (a chant for ants), “Napurana” (name of a vulture-like bird) and “Brandlin”
(a samba). The music of the Tapebas is used as a springing board for Perelman to present his vision of the sounds of
Brazil. In the first album of the trilogy,
Ivo, the inspiration was the melodies of the Portuguese colonizers.
Children of Ibeji explored the African influence on Brazilian music. To get the CD call (201) 433-3907 or send E-mail
to: noprob@delphi.com

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