Brazil’s Development Train Is Running Late, Says Minister

Brazil’s various state-run enterprises have committed themselves to developing educational projects in four areas the government considers strategic priorities: strengthening and expanding public universities (which are tuition-free); expanding technical and professional courses; improving the quality of elementary education; and, eliminating illiteracy and social exclusion.

According to Minister of Education, Tarso Genro, speaking at a forum on the issue, at the moment, state-run enterprises are involved in some 200 educational projects, but they are not coordinated.


“We are using this forum (Fórum das Estatais pela Educação) to give direction and control to the work that is being done.”

An example of what the project can do which was cited by the Minister is the so-called “factory floor” school program that will become operational next year.


The schools will be located within state-run enterprises where students can be prepared for work in their areas of activities, either in the public or the private sector.

Genro says the government’s state-run enterprises are willing participants.


“They can play an important role. They have various types of resources, besides physical facilities. Professional training and literacy projects will be their strong suit,” declared the Minister.

Genro went on to say that one aspect of the university reform project is to expand polytechnic type institutions around the country.


“These universities must be linked to regional development needs. A local state-run enterprise meets that requirement and can help the university fit in,” said the Minister.

Minister José Dirceu, the presidential Chief of Staff, who coordinates the forum, says that Brazil is trying to pay off a debt it has with education.


The state-run enterprise sector is a powerful, efficient research engine that we can put to work in the education sector, he said. But the development train is running late and we have to bring the future to the present right now, said the minister. “Brazil cannot wait,” he declared.

Agência Brasil
Reporter:Paula Medeiros
Translator: Allen Bennett

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

RAPIDINHAS

There is a sad note about both works reviewed. The artists in them are ...

Brazil Invests 1% of GDP in Technology. That’s Not Enough.

The only way Latin America can overcome 25 years of low economic growth is ...

In Copenhagen Brazil Praises Own Plan and Calls US’s and EU’s Proposal a Scandal

Brazilian minister Dilma Rousseff, the Lula administration's chief of staff and would-be candidate in ...

Protests against Bush in São Paulo

Anti-Bush Protest in Brazil Turns into War Against Police

A popular protest against the visit of American president George W. Bush to Brazil ...

Brazilian Market Falls Erasing Earlier Gains

Latin American stocks dropped, as investors cashed in some of the region’s strong gains ...

The Day Brazil’s Economist Furtado Became Sartre’s Chauffeur

Around the middle of October 1960, on a Friday afternoon, Celso Furtado decides to ...

Brazil to Have Tough Time Replacing Argentina in Mercosur Chair

This week in Cordoba, Argentina will be handing the Mercosur chair for the next ...

Downtown São Paulo seen from the Ibirapuera park

São Paulo, Brazil’s Largest City, Isn’t Just All Business Anymore

Everything is superlative in São Paulo, from the size of the city to the ...

America is bad, Brazil is worse

Since we’ve published in our January issue “America, the Ugly”, an interview with Ana ...

Mercosur Members Gather in Brazil in Effort to Fix Fractured Group

Mercosur presidential summit next week in Brazil has on the table an agenda of ...