Brazil’s Electronic Ballot Spreads Throughout Latin America

The election coordenator of the Unit for the Promotion of Democracy at the Organization of American States (OAS), Santiago Murray, says that the Brazilian electronic voting system (called urnas eletrônicas in Portuguese) will be used in more Latin American nations.

“We are working with the Brazilian Election Commission (Tribunal Superior Eleitoral) (TSE) on the details. The system will be used in other countries because it is transparent and reliable.


We were able to confirm that in the last Brazilian election,” declared Murray, praising yesterday’s elections in Brazil and calling them well-organized.


“The long process to reach a well-run election was both political and social. It was a rich experience.”


Yesterday’s municipal elections in Brazil were the largest ever run using an electronic voting system anywhere in the world.


A total of almost 360,000 electronic voting machines were used (another 45,000 were available for backup). The election was observed by 25 international representatives who were invited by the TSE.


The Brazilian electronic voting system already has an international track record. It has been used in Argentina, Mexico and Paraguay. And on October 17, will be used in Ecuador.


No Printed Ballot


Last year, Brazil’s Chamber of Deputies approved the end of printed votes in electronic ballot boxes. Printed votes were used only in the 2002 elections. The project, elaborated by Senator Eduardo Azeredo, replaced the printed vote by a digital register.


The Senator argued that implanting the printing system throughout the country would entail a high cost, because the mechanism would have to be installed in over 350 thousand electronic ballot boxes that are not outfitted with vote printers.


Prior to the voting on the bill, the president of the Federal Elections Court (TSE), Minister Sepúlveda Pertence, met with the president of the Chamber, Deputy João Paulo Cunha, and party leaders to explain the reliability of the electronic ballot system, and he informed that installation of the printing system would entail expenditures of around US$ 150 million.


He emphasized the difficulties caused by the printed vote in the 2002 elections, with longer lines, higher numbers of blank and invalid votes, and, most of all, problems in the printing, which led many polling places to resort to handwritten ballots.


Pertence also informed that in the 20 thousand polling places in which there were printed votes in 2002, 30.2% had to resort to handwritten ballots, as against 0.68% in ballot boxes without printed votes.


Agência Brasil
Translator: Allen Bennett

Tags:

  • Show Comments (2)

  • Guest

    Electronic Fraud
    Pleae research Venezuela´s case where a fraud was committed.They send the votes to a severto statiscally maked up results favoring the government candidates. BEWARE!

  • Guest

    Power supply
    Hello
    I am a student from Tanzania, East Africa, currently at Dortmund University. I have been impressed by this idea of Electronic voting in a developing country. It is a good example other “Third World” countries could learn from, because electronic voting is quite good, quick and almost free of fraud.

    My quetion, however, is how do you ennsure enough power supply for your electronic voting especially in remote areas? Secondly, how do you quckly communicate the election results to the central election authorities?

    Please communicate the answer directly to me at:
    kamugisha.byabato@uni-dortmund.de
    or
    byabato_k_a_w@yahoo.co.uk

    Thanks very much.
    K. Byabato

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Florida’s Jeb Bush Joins Brazil in Promoting Ethanol in the Americas

At a press conference today, Florida governor Jeb Bush; Roberto Rodrigues, former Brazilian Minister ...

Brazil’s Boeing Accident Report Concludes Nothing and Blames No One

The just-released preliminary report on the September 29 Boeing 737 accident in the Brazilian ...

Serra Still in Lead of Brazil’s Presidential Race Despite Lula’s Opposition

Dilma Rousseff, presidential candidate of Brazil’s ruling coalition will continue with the current economic ...

Brazil Exports 31% of World’s Beef. Russia Still Main Importer.

Brazilian beef exports yielded US$ 351.6 million in June, which represented an increase in ...

Brazil Will Stay in Haiti to Prevent a New Rwanda Massacre

Brazil has no timetable to withdraw its troops under United Nations flag from Haiti ...

In Protectionist Measure Brazil Slaps 25% Tax in 100 Imported Products

The Brazilian council of ministers of the Foreign Trade Board (Camex) increased the import ...

The Battisti Affair Hasn’t Sated Italy’s Appetite for Doing Business with Brazil

Cesare Battisti, a member of Italy’s Armed Proletarians for Communism (PAC), lives comfortably in ...

Brazil investing close to US$ 5 billion in biotechnology

Brazil Wants to Be a Biotech Powerhouse in 15 Years

Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, earlier this month, launched a new development ...

Fed Up with “Dollar Tensions” Brazil and Argentina Step Up Trade in Local Currency

In order to avoid being submitted to the "greenback's tensions," Mercosur, the South American ...

Killer Dengue Season Is Back in Brazil

Brazil’s Ministry of Health launched a new campaign against dengue and announced that ads ...