Dialogue Is Dead, Say Brazilian Indians

Sluggish, aligned with contrary interests, and marked by inaction. These were some of the expressions used by Coiab and Apoinme  to describe the Brazilian official indigenous policy in a Manifesto Against the Indigenous Policy of the Lula Administration.

Coiab is the Coordinating Board of the Indigenous Organizations of the Brazilian Amazon and Apoinme is the Association of Indigenous Peoples and Organizations of the Northeast, Minas Gerais and Espí­rito Santo.


The recently-released manifesto denounces the increasing violation of indigenous rights in Brazil. In the document, various cases of violations of rights registered during the first 18 months of the Lula administration are listed.


Among them, mention is made of unfulfilled campaign promises, such as the official confirmation of the bounds of the Raposa/Serra do Sol indigenous land as a continuous strip, and unconstitutional decisions taken by the present federal administration, such as the one to reduce the size of the Baú land of the Kayapó people in the state of Pará.


The organizations also criticized the plans of the federal administration to militarize the indigenous policy.


“Contradicting the expectations of indigenous peoples and organizations, the Government militarized the federal indigenous policy by transferring the responsibility for formulating it to the Institutional Safety Office,” the manifesto says.


In the text, the organizations say that the dialogue between the indigenous movement and the federal administration came to a standstill.


In practice, the Lula administration stopped dialoguing with indigenous peoples and organizations, so much so that the president of the federal agency in charge of indigenous affairs, the National Indigenous Foundation (Funai), Mércio Pereira Gomes, said that he does not recognize indigenous organizations as interlocutors.


In this context, the so-called “Dialogue Table” set up during an audience granted by the President of the Republic on May 10 does not exist anymore.


Actually, the sluggishness and neglect of the Government in relation to indigenous rights have favored the growth and strengthened the actions of sectors and parliamentarians who oppose indigenous rights inside and outside the National Congress, who are interested in eliminating rights enshrined in the Federal Constitution of 1988.


Finally, Coiab and Apoinme called on other indigenous organizations and supporters of the indigenous cause and human rights to demand from the government “a conduct in tune with the commitments it professed for over two decades in relation to indigenous peoples and organizations in Brazil.”


The full document is available at the Cimi website (www.cimi.org.br).


Cimi – Indianist Missionary Council

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

While the World Tightens Belt Brazilians Go Shopping

Brazil is proving to be the best alternative for national – and even foreign ...

A New Push in Brazil for Conservation and Ecotourism

Brazil’s Ministry of Environment (MMA) announced, March 18, in São Paulo’s Ribeira Valley, the ...

Brazil’s Agribusiness Exports Reach US$ 7.9 Billion in July. A 50% Growth

Brazil agribusiness' trade balance posted two significant results this past July: exports totaled US$ ...

Brazil Police Evict Indians and Abandon Them on Roadside

Brazil’s Federal Police and Mato Grosso do Sul state police agents, acting under a ...

In Brazil, Monsanto and Syngenta Lead Farm Model that Destroys Indians and Environment

The approval of Brazil's Provisionary Measure 422 (Medida Provisória (MP) 422) by the Brazilian ...

U.S. Snow: ‘Delighted for Brazilian Friends’

I was pleased to hear the announcement by my counterpart in Brazil, Finance Minister ...

Brazil’s Mining Giant CVRD Spending US$ 5 Bi. Blame It on the Chinese

Brazilian Mining company Vale do Rio Doce (CVRD) should invest 11.8 billion reais (US$ ...

Brazil Diaspora Meets in Rio to Discuss Expatriates Life

Brazilian living abroad are planning a great forum, later this month, for Rio de ...

An Absent US Panned by Brazil and South American Military

Mercosur Armies Chief of Staff Commanders meeting in Chile decided to make the organization ...

Brazilian Vale Buys Mines from Rio Tinto in Canada, Argentina, Brazil

Rio Tinto Group, an Anglo-Australian company, is selling mining assets in Argentina, Brazil and ...