Brazil’s Shout of the Excluded Demands New Economic Model

The manifesto of the Shout of the Excluded, a movement that got underway Monday, September 5, in cities throughout Brazil and culminates in the September 7 Brazilian Independence Day commemorations, calls for “profound changes in the economy and politics.”

The text is expected to be read at all events of the Shout, whose theme this year is “Change is in our hands.”


After pointing out in its opening passage that “around 20 million families, that is, 82 million poor people subsist monthly on less than two minimum wages,” the manifesto criticizes the persistence of the primary surplus policy and high interest rates and affirms that “this economic model offers no future to our nation.”


The manifesto also addresses the political crisis, asserting that “the people no longer trust the majority of politicians, and these [politicians] lack legitimacy to represent the people.


“The Brazilian people are experiencing a mixture of sadness and disappointment in view of the situation in our country. The Brazilian nation cannot remain in this predicament.”


The document outlines four proposals, presented as “great challenges”: change in the economic model, an emergency program to overcome extreme poverty, “profound and radical” political reform, and restoration of national sovereignty.


The organization of the Shout of the Excluded arose in 1994, a year before the first demonstration took place. The original proposal was for it to be an extension of the Fraternity Campaign, which is held annually during Lent by the Brazilian National Bishops’ Confederation (CNBB).


The Shout was also intended to reinforce the Second Brazilian Social Week, which had as its theme, “Brazil – Alternatives and Protagonists.”


Agência Brasil

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil’s Northeast Has Gas Shortfall and It’s Getting Worse

The director of the Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels Agency (Agência Nacional do Petróleo, ...

Freedom of Press Violated in US, Brazil and Across Americas

The Office of the Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression of the Inter-American Commission ...

Brazil’s Credeal: Exporting Notebooks Is Good Business

Credeal, a school supplies factory from the southernmost Brazilian state of Rio Grande do ...

RAPIDINHAS

The newest Nobel Prize in Literature, Portuguese writer José Saramago has just released another ...

In Brazil, Indians Win Land But Can’t Get It

The Xavante Indians were expelled from their land in 1967. In 1998, the demarcation ...

Texas-Based Firm Partners with Brazil in Spreading Computer Culture

The Education Secretariat of Goiás state in Brazil has launched the Simdesk on-demand computing ...

In Brazil, Gossip Is News, Too

A royal horse in Spain condemns Lula’s bad manners by doing its business in ...

Rural Workers Invade Bank of Brazil to Make Their Case

On the morning of March 11, dozens of farmers involved in the social movements ...

AA Flies Nonstop from Miami to Belo Horizonte and Salvador in Brazil

Starting in November American Airlines will add three destinations in Brazil to its route ...

Brazil’s Lula Wins Votes in the South, the Opposition’s Stronghold

Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva has again taken the lead over his ...