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Fearing Brazil’s Foot and Mouth Disease Uruguay Steps Up Sanitary Controls

Uruguay stepped up border sanitary controls in anticipation of "unpleasant" surprises following at least fourteen outbreaks of foot and mouth disease in neighboring Brazil.

Although the quarantined area in Brazil is almost 800 miles north, Uruguayan authorities fear that the depressed values of Brazilian livestock and beef, because of FAM, could become a strong temptation along the relatively open border area.

Speaking on national radio and television, Uruguay’s Director of Livestock and Food Health Services Francisco Muzio said the stepped up prevention measures include reinforcement of sanitary barriers, vehicle and footwear disinfection and aspersion in crossings and combined sanitary-military patrolling along the border.

Mr. Muzio also called upon hog farmers to avoid purchasing uncertified animals and making sure all organic residue feed is cooked.

"We call upon the people to spare all risk to the excellent sanitary status of Uruguay, particularly by not feeding hogs with organic or food refuse", said Mr. Muzio.

Uruguayan food sanitary services also announced a total import restriction on beef and any meat produce originated in Brazil.

Vaccination against FAM for calves born between January and August 31, 2005 was advanced to November to complement overall immunity.

Uruguay’s Finance Ministry and the Inter American Development Fund granted additional funds to finance the prevention operation.

This article appeared originally in Mercopress – www.mercopress.com.

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  • Guest

    impact partnership while saving citizens
    though i am not familiar with uruguayan and brailian historical relationships, hopefully the two nations exchanged a few thoughts prior to this restriction. one question is can a country track their own meat supply to identify its origination within its own borders? if not, then what uruguayan govenment has done is appropriate enlight of secure safe food for their citizens. now, the brazilian government (as others around the world) should work on improving their tracking and monitoring the food supply.

    acommon(northern traveler heading to south america soon)
    rob j>

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