40% of Young Brazilians Don’t Know How AIDS Is Transmitted

600 thousand of Latin America’s total of 1.8 million HIV carriers live in Brazil, according to the United Nations’ Global Report on AIDS for 2005.

The document was released today by the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

Since 2003, 200 thousand new cases have been reported in Latin America, as well as 66 thousand deaths. The report explains that the large concentration of cases in Brazil is basically a reflection of the country’s large population of around 180 million inhabitants.

With regard to Brazil, the study emphasizes the lack of information among young people in the 15-24 age bracket about the ways the disease is transmitted. In spontaneous responses, around 38% of them were unable to name the means of infection.

According to Pedro Chequer, director of Brazil’s National Program for Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD/AIDS), when the responses are elicited in the form of multiple choice, over 90% of the youth display knowledge of the topic.

With regard to the global situation, the report indicates that, despite the drop in the number of cases reported in some countries, the AIDS epidemic continues to expand, reaching a total of around 40.3 million people in 2005.

In 2003 the total number of victims was 37.5 million (the report omits data referring to 2004).

Averted Deaths

The estimate presented in the global report on AIDS drafted by the UNAIDS and the WHO is that as many as 350 thousand deaths have been averted by the expanded healthcare coverage of disease victims.

The director of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in Latin America and the Caribbean, Nils Kastberg, said that the document, which was released today, points to some advances in the campaign against the disease.

The number of cases in Kenya, Zimbabwe, and some Caribbean countries has declined in recent years. In the Caribbean, for example, the number of HIV carriers has remained stable at 300 thousand cases in relation to 2003.

"In Haiti there was a decline, which shows clearly that, through a multisectorial effort, the number of people with HIV can be reduced," Kastberg observed.

The study also acknowledges that access to AIDS treatment has improved significantly in the last two years.

"Over a million people in low and medium income countries now enjoy longer and better lives, because they are receiving anti-retroviral treatment," the document notes.

Agência Brasil

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil Campaign Raises Bone Marrow Donors to 130,000

After a yearlong campaign to encourage bone marrow donations, the number of donors has ...

After a Year of Growth São Paulo’s Industrial Job Offers Go Down

São Paulo’s industrial sector has created 100,000 jobs since January, an increase of 3.87%, ...

In Brazil, Dilma Woman Takes Place of Lula Man as President’s Chief of Staff

Gleisi Helena Hoffmann, 45, a Brazilian senator and wife of Brazil’s Communications Minister Paulo ...

Brazil’s Pragmatic, Anti-American Look at Beijing’s Olympics

Brazilian people’s feelings about the Olympic games in Beijing are as diverse as the ...

Lula Says There Will Be No Coverup of Corruption in Brazil

Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, speaking at the IV Global Forum on ...

Brazilian and Chinese Women Discuss Their Role in Politics

The evolution of female participation in politics in Brazil and China was the main ...

Brazil Tries to Show the Positive Side of a Weak Dollar

The executive secretary of Brazil’s Ministry of Development, Industry, and Foreign Trade, Márcio Fortes ...

If It Is TV Brazil Why Most Brazilians Were Left Out?

The launch of TV Brasil, Thursday, February 2, may provoke two lines of discussion, ...

Saint Leonel Brizola of Brazil

In Brazil, you just need to die to become a saint. Take Leonel Brizola, ...

Back from Brazil, Rio Gringa Is Ready for Other Flights

Readers who follow my  "Odds and Ends" on The Brasilians newspaper pages are aware ...