Lack of Skills Makes 60% of Brazilians Unemployable

Brazil’s Ministry of Labor says that one of the country’s serious development bottlenecks is the lack of skilled workers. Brazilian companies are turning away people because they cannot perform certain tasks.

The Ministry says it has data showing that 60% of the people who go through the National Work System (Sine) (a government employment agency) do not get jobs because they have no marketable skills.

To deal with this problem, Minister of Labor, Luiz Marinho, and the president of the National Industrial Confederation, Armando Monteiro Neto, have signed a contract for the training of unemployed personnel.

The program will focus on low-income individuals, between the ages of 16 and 24, or over 40, women, households heads and the handicapped.

The program will train 10,000 workers over a four-year period in the areas of mechanics, maintenance and electricity and electronics. Pilot programs will begin in the states of Acre, Minas Gerais, Pernambuco and Rio Grande do Sul.

Marinho declared that with the economy growing it is essential to have skilled people. "In a number of areas there are job openings but no one qualified to do the work," he said, adding that the new program will give skills to young workers.

Monteiro Neto declared that the Brazilian business community is more aware of its responsibilities, not only in jobs, but in social programs and protection of the environment.

He went on to say that the skilled worker was an important part of that new reality where education, health and social security it also important, along with the problems of discrimination, the handicapped and child labor.

Nowadays businesses are interested in a broad approach to worker quality of life in the communities where they exercise their activities, he declared.

Tags:

You May Also Like

MST, is Brazil's Landless Workers Movement

3,000 Brazilian Landless Take Over Farm in the Federal District

More than 600 families, about 3,000 people, from Brazil's Landless Movement occupied an abandoned ...

National Mêlée

The Brazilian national anthem has a story that involves Don Pedro I, the Portuguese ...

Brazil’s Carnaval: Easy on the Eyes, Hard on the Heart

Seven of Rio’s top-tier samba groups wrapped up their parading Monday morning, driving out ...

Brazil Urges Portuguese-Speaking Nations to Work Together on Environment

Approving a Cooperation Platform among Portuguese-speaking countries was discussed, Wednesday, May 24, by technical ...

All Eyes on Brazilian Senate for Minimum Wage Vote

The Senate is expected to have a busy week. However, the leader of the ...

Brazilian Armoured Car’s Next Stop: Iraq

Brazilian company Inbra Blindados, specialized in the armouring of vehicles and equipment for ballistic ...

Cargo and Foreign Routes Bring Brazil’s TAM 10% Boost in Revenues

Brazil's flagship airline TAM ended last year with a 10% increase in gross revenues, ...

Boom Times for Rio, Brazil: US$ 70 Billion to Be Invested in 3 Years

Exploration of oil in Campos Basin, the Petrobras investment, the construction of the Angra ...

Brazil’s Mummy Studied in Turin Congress

Interested in ancient Egypt, the first Brazilian emperor, Dom Pedro I, acquired, in the ...

Amid World Crisis Brazil’s Lula Gets Stratospheric 80% Approval

Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva and his administration's approval rating soared to ...