Brazil Keeps Dragging Its Feet on Updating Productivity Indices

The expected update of Brazil’s Land Productivity Indices, used to identify land that is unproductive and available for the purposes of Agrarian Reform, has been delayed once again.

The Brazilian Minister of Agrarian Development, Miguel Rosseto, announced now that the actual updating will take place in February of this year.

The Lula government had promised to update these indices at the beginning of its first mandate, in 2003, yet to this day the update has not been finalized. Last year, for example, Minister Rosseto stated he would delay the update only until October of 2005.

Though the National Constitution requires an update of the indices every 10 years, the last modification took place in 1976. According to José Juliano de Carvalho Filho, retired Economics and Administration Professor at the University of São Paulo (FEA/USP) and member of the National Association for Agrarian Reform (ABRA), "the indices are fundamental because they allow for the identification of lands to be used for land reform. This is something that the government promised several times already".

Updating of the indices is under negotiations between the Minister of Agrarian Development and the Minister of Agriculture. Professor Carvalho Filho agrees with the position of the social movements, that a lack of political will is the only thing that has held back the update for over 20 years.

"I think this delay is absurd. It demonstrates a total lack of commitment on the part of the government in implementing anything that might even resemble Agrarian Reform. Instead we are seeing only settlement projects that are the result of the social movement’s pressures, without which we probably would have seen nothing," stated José Juliano.

The MST (Landless Movement) estimates that once the indices are updated, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul alone (one of Brazil’s smaller states) 40,000 hectares of land will be identified as unproductive, making them automatically available for land reform. These lands could then become the sites for food production for the entire nation.

MST – www.mst.org.br

Tags:

You May Also Like

Brazil’s Paulo Coelho, a Bestseller in Russia, Meets Putin

President Vladimir Putin met with Brazilian author Paulo Coelho, who shared his impressions of ...

Rio Police Kill One for Every 23 Arrested, in US There is One Death for 37,000

A report by Human Rights Watch a non-governmental organization (NGO)  reveals that many killings ...

Germany Wants Closer Economic Ties with Brazil

Around 30 representatives from the state of Baden-Württemberg, one of Germany’s most important economic ...

Brazilian Airline Gol Owes Its Huge Success to the Internet

Gol, Brazil’s low cost, low fare airline finished its second consecutive year as one ...

Free and Open-source Software Hailed in Brazil’s Global Internet Forum

Gathered in Rio de Janeiro, in Brazil's Southeast, participants at the United Nations Internet ...

American President George W. Bush and the first lady arrive in Brazil

Snubbing Chavez and Seducing Brazil Are Two Sides of Same Bush Game

George W. Bush’s trip to Latin America this month is the most ambitious attempt ...

Brazil Strategy Network

US-Brazil Group to Focus on Civil Society in National Meeting in NY

The Brazil Strategy Network (BSN) will hold its fourth annual National Meeting on Saturday, ...

Brazil Blames Dismal GDP on Peoples’ Love for Soccer

Brazil’s economy expanded less than anticipated in the second quarter as workers across the ...

UN Hears About Plight of Brazilian Indian

The assassination of Indians in Brazil and the risky situation of human right defenders ...

Brazil: Expect a No-Bubbles Growth

According to Brazil’s Central Bank president, Henrique Meirelles, the country is ready for renewed ...