Japan Offers Over Half a Billion Dollars to Have Their Digital TV in Brazil

Representatives of the Japanese system of Digital TV (DTV) said, this Thursday, February 2, that they are willing to pay more to the Brazilian government than the 400 million euros proposed by the Europeans, for having their system established in Brazil.

After a meeting with the Ministers of Communications, Hélio Costa, of Development, Luiz Fernando Furlan, of Finance, Antonio Palocci, and the Chief of Staff, Dilma Rousseff, the association responsible for the specifications of the Japanese telecommunications and broadcasting system, ARIB, said that the exact amount would depend on the Brazilian demand.

Hélio Costa said he was satisfied with the presentation the Japanese made during the meeting with the team responsible for analyzing the proposals of the three DTV standards – European, Japanese, and American. When asked about the willingness of the Japanese to pay more than what was proposed by the European, Costa was objective: "We are sure there will be a better proposal."

According to Costa, the Japanese system "strictly" meets all what is required by the Brazilian system of DTV. "They have high definition, mobility, as well as interactivity in the same channel, without the need of an extra channel."

In a press conference, the Minister denied the information given by the representatives of the European system that they were already operating in Taiwan, with mobility and interactivity, in the 6 MHZ channel. Costa said that a research found out this was not true.

The team responsible for analyzing the proposals will meet again next Tuesday,  February 7, with representatives of the American standard. After that meeting, the team will prepare a report on the three proposals and submit it to President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who will decide which DTV system will be implemented in Brazil.

Agência Brasil

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