Public Works and Poor Aid Return Lula to First in Line for Presidency

Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s popularity has bounced back from a corruption scandal that threatened to derail his government, making him the favorite to win October’s election, a poll showed on Tuesday, February 21.

Just a few months ago, it appeared that a scandal over illegal campaign funding had ruined Lula’s chances of a second term. Several polls showed the former factory worker losing, raising questions about whether he would even seek reelection.

But with the scandal fading and the economy gaining steam, Lula’s popularity is growing again. Tuesday’s poll was the first in months to show Lula winning the election in a runoff.

"The scare is beginning to pass," said Ricardo Guedes, director of the Sensus Institute, which conducted the poll. "Voters are starting to focus instead on the government’s achievements."

The poll, commissioned by Brazil’s National Transport Confederation, showed Lula’s approval rating jumped to 53.3 percent from a low of 46.7 percent in November. The government’s approval rating also improved, rising to 37.5 percent from 31.1 percent.

The survey was the third poll in less than a month to bring good news for Lula. His ratings suffered in the second half of 2005 after the ruling Workers’ Party admitted to using illegal campaign funds and was accused of buying votes in Congress.

í‰poca news magazine ran a cover story this weekend on Lula’s election chances headlined: "Who said he was dead?"

Key support came from the poor, many of whom have benefited from government aid programs such as Bolsa Famí­lia, which pays monthly stipends to families living below the poverty line.

Lula has also bolstered his standing by travelling across Brazil to inaugurate public works projects while opposition parties are still scrambling to come up with a candidate.

"The government isn’t officially on the campaign trail, but it is beginning to showcase what it has done in the media," Guedes said.

Tuesday’s poll showed Lula would win the election in a runoff vote, beating José Serra of the opposition Brazilian Social Democracy Party, or PSDB.

The survey, which has a margin of error of 3 percentage points, gave Lula 47.6 percent of the vote in a second round versus 37.6 percent in November. Serra, who was trounced by Lula in the 2002 race, had 37.6 percent compared with 41.5 percent

Another survey, this one by DataFolha shows that if the presidential election scheduled for October were held today, the president would win 48 percent to 43 percent against São Paulo mayor Serra.

He would also prevail in a match against another popular contender, São Paulo state governor Geraldo Alckmin. Serra and Alckmin are competing for their party’s nomination.

The DataFolha survey listened to more than 2,600 people and was taken Monday and Tuesday, January 21 and 22. It has a margin of error of three points in either direction.

Mercopress – www.mercopress.com

Tags:

  • Show Comments (1)

  • Guest

    Great Lula, Great !
    dunring the first 3 years of Lula mandate, he cut spendings, and cut again spendings, saved what was not spent, and frees the saved money for his re-election !

    Is that not vote buying ?
    Is that not dirty tricks ?
    Is this accepted by Brazilian society ?

    Great Lula ! You fucked everyone and will will fuck everyone again, for another 4 years.

    Will he, like Chavez his best friend is doing now trying to change the constitution to allow a perpetual re-election ?

    Who bets he will do this in the next 4 years, if he is re-elected !

    But of course, Lula is against re-election as he said a few weeks ago, but not against his own re-election ! quite a difference !

    This guy lies through his teeth during all his life !
    His dream : to be canonized, as one article reported !

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Malaria mosquito

Brazilian Guinea Pigs: Torture in the Name of Science

Often we discover denunciations to be less serious when we check on them in ...

In Ten Years Brazil Frees 17,000 Slave Workers

Brazil’s Ministry of Labor’s Special Mobile Inspection Group (Grupo Especial de Fiscalização Móvel do ...

Brazil’s New Luxurious Jet Has Internet and Can Fly Non Stop New York-London

Brazilian aircraft manufacturer Embraer launched this Tuesday, May 2, a new executive jet, the ...

Brazilian bishop Luiz Flávio Cappio

Lula’s and Pope’s Emissaries Try to End Brazilian Bishop’s Hunger Strike

The head of the Brazilian Secretariat of Institutional Relations, Minister Jaques Wagner, is on ...

Despite Lower Dollar Brazilian Shoemaker Wants to Export More

Grendene, a shoe company from Brazil, has expanded the volume of its exports by ...

Brazilian Foreign Traders Call for Less Taxes and Red Tape

The 28th National Foreign Trade Meeting (Enaex), held last month in the city of ...

Brazil Minister Says 5 New Hydroelectric Plants in the Amazon Were Inspired by Avatar, the Movie

The president of Brazil, Dilma Rousseff, signed the decree for the construction of five ...

First Group of Palestinian Refugees Arrive in Brazil

Brazil received today the first group of Palestinian refugees who have been living in ...

300 Brazilian Agents Chase Internet Bank Account Raiders

Using more than 300 agents and covering five Brazilian states Brazil’s Federal Police unleashed ...