Brazilian Army Recovers Weapons Stolen by Drug Traffickers

Brazilian Army headquarters in Rio de Janeiro (Comando Militar do Leste) reports that they have recovered the ten rifles and a pistol that were stolen from an Army unit earlier this month.

For the last eleven days since the robbery, Army troops have invaded and scoured slums in Rio looking for the weapons. Their presence in the slums caused a number of skirmishes with drug traffickers resulting in firefights and explosions. There were civilian casualties.

On March 3, a gang of bandits overpowered sentinels at an Army unit in Rio de Janeiro and robbed ten rifles and a pistol. The Army response was unexpected and unexpectedly severe.

For eleven consecutive days and nights, troops invaded and scoured slum areas in the city ostensibly searching for the stolen weapons, but also disrupting the lives of slum dwellers and the business of criminal elements (mainly drug dealers).

Some reports say that as much as 70% of drug trafficking activities ground to a halt because of the presence of the Army.

According to vice president and minister of Defense, José Alencar, if the government of Rio de Janeiro requests Army assistance in combating crime it could receive that assistance.

"The Army does not run, the Army does not retreat," he said, explaining that if there is a formal request, which is necessary, the city could get help from the military.

Alencar said that the presence of the Army troops on the city streets and in the slums over the past few days had been "beneficial," lowering crime rates. He pointed out that the Army had operated legally, with search and arrest warrants.

"Sometimes we are maybe a little too comprehensive about crime. We comprehend and crime grows. Perhaps we need more direct action like putting Army troops on the streets to show that crime does not pay," said the vice president.

Alencar said he had informed president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva that the Army had recovered its stolen weapons. "The President said he was satisfied and praised the action by the Army," said Alencar.

Agência Brasil

Tags:

  • Show Comments (4)

  • Guest

    error WEAPONS

  • Guest

    WEPAPON GONE BUT PROBLEMS REMAIN
    This is great news that the army has recovered the stolen guns from the fervelas but what happens next?

    How are these people suppose to live? What jobs do they have? What training programmes are they engaged in to keep them occupied? We all know that drugs, trafficking and dealing are wrong but what alternative is the government giving to the poor in the form of work, training or earning money?

    Putting the army on the streets to watch the inhabitants of the fervelas 24- 7 does nothing at all to improve this situation apart from restoring law and order. What Brazil needs is to find effective long term solutions to this unfortunate man made legacy.

    Is Brazil going to wake up and listen to the recommendations from the World Bank so it can eliminate this social disaster once and for all?

  • Guest

    you are right!!!!!!!!!
    concordo!!!!!!!

  • Guest

    Sometimes….
    you are maybe a little too comprehensive about crime ??????

    Strange statement from a Vice President…of Brazil !!!!!

    Is he not aware that Brazil is one of the most violent country in this planet ?

    Is he not aware that you have around 40’000 violent deaths
    annually, mosty unpunished and that did not even go to trial ???

    Is he not aware that hundreds and hundreds of poors huave been killed by large landowners, and that not even ten killers went to jail ?

    What does this guy do all day long….instead of working ????

    Drinking CachaÀ§a with a few prostitutes…paid by CaÀ¯xas 2, or 3 ?????

    With Lula the junkie…obviously !

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

FIFA Says Yes to Brazil’s Bid to Host 2014 World Cup

FIFA, the International Football Federation has recommended Brazil to host the World Cup in ...

Brazil Trains Hundreds of Doctors in Robotic Surgery

The Syrian-Lebanese Hospital, in São Paulo, in the Brazilian Southeast, is going to start ...

Brazilian Government Becomes Sponsor of Indy Races

Brazil's trade promotion agency, APEX-Brasil's, decision to sponsor the top ethanol-powered auto racing category, ...

Gas Retailers in Brazil Accuse Sugar Mill Owners of Lack of Scruples

According to the Retail Fuel Merchants’ Syndicate (Sindicomb), the problems that the Brazilian federal ...

Journalist, a Dangerous Job in Brazil

About 20 million Brazilians have access to the Internet. Brazil publishes more daily newspapers ...

Brazil Loses 5 Million Tons of Soybeans to Rust

The representative of Brazil’s National Confederation of Agriculture (CNA), Alécio Maróstica, informed that Asian rust, ...

Raça, a magazine for Brazilian blacks

In Race Matters the US Is Becoming More and More Like Brazil

As several historical studies have proven, descriptions of rape and the subsequent effects on ...

ACM – Brazil Will Never See His Like Again

Few people outside Brazil have heard of Antonio Carlos Magalhães who died on July ...

A Brazilian’s Theory on Heart Disease Gets Some Respect in the US

Considered fascinating by many physicians and scientists, the myogenic theory of myocardial infarction, developed ...