World May Lose Over 40% of Brazil’s Amazon by 2050

Unless Brazil enforces existing conservation laws and takes steps to prevent deforestation on private land, it will lose more then 40 per cent of its Amazon rainforest by 2050, say scientists.

The predictions, published on March 24 in Nature magazine, are among the first to emerge from a unique, large-scale study that is using computer models to simulate how factors such as logging, farming, climate and policy decisions could affect the future of the forest.

The models predict that unless Brazil takes action, eight of the Amazon basin’s twelve main watersheds will lose more than half of their forest, increasing the risk of flooding. 

They also suggest that almost 100 of the region’s wild mammal species could lose more than half of their habitat.

The news is not all bad, however, says lead author Britaldo Soares-Filho of the Federal University of Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

The study predicts that if Brazil puts in place measures to protect the Amazon, as much as 73 per cent of it could remain intact in 2050.

To achieve this, Brazil would need to enforce existing laws and prevent the loss of rainforest on private land by creating economic incentives for farmers to manage their land sustainably.

As well as protecting watersheds and conserving biodiversity, this would prevent 17 billion tons of carbon being released into the atmosphere by 2050, say the researchers.

Under the model’s optimistic scenario, the Amazon would still have 4.5 million square kilometers of living forest in 2050, Soares-Filho told reporters. Currently, the Brazilian Amazon covers 5.3 million square kilometers.

Brazil is making increasing efforts to control deforestation, and to set up more than 70,000 square kilometers of new conservation areas that were designated in 2004 and 2005.

But, says Soares-Filho, this is not enough as most areas at risk are on private land that could be profitably deforested for timber or to farm cattle or soybeans.

The researchers say that ways of encouraging farmers to manage their forested land sustainably could include certification schemes that reward environmentally sound timber production, or a carbon trading scheme to reward avoided greenhouse gas emissions.

This article appeared originally in Science and Development Network – www.scidev.net.

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  • Guest

    STRANGE HEADLINE !!!!!
    DOES THE AMAZON BELONGS TO THER WORLD OR TO BRAZIL ?????

    IF IT BELONGS TO THE WORLD, NO ONE HAS GIVEN YOU THE AUTHORITY TO DEFOREST IT AS YOU DO.
    If it belongs to you….that is another story !

    But mixing and confusing phrases just as it pleases and when it pleases a few is not FAIR !!!!!!

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