No Indian Candidate, Among 24, Won in Brazil’s October 1st Election

In the elections held on October 1st, in Brazil, five indigenous people ran for House representative and 19 for state assemblyman. None of them was elected. In 2002, three indigenous people ran for federal representative and 17 for state representative.

The new fact is that the number of votes on indigenous people increased. Together, all the candidates for federal representative received 17,065 votes. In 2002, they received 4,282 votes. As for votes in state representatives, they increased from 9,089 in 2002 to 19,752 in 2006.

The indigenous candidate for state representative with the highest number of votes was Adir Tikuna, from the state of Amazonas, who got 5,679 votes. The representative who was elected with the lowest number of votes in the state of Amazonas got 7,569 votes.

In 2004, when Brazilians elected mayors and city councils, 70% of the Brazilian Indians voted. More than 350 of them were candidates. At that time, four were elected mayors and about 95 won a seat as a city council member.

Mário Juruna, a Xavante Indian, from Mato Grosso state, was the first and only Indian until now to win a post outside the city limits.

He became a House representative in 1982, elected by the state of Rio de Janeiro. Juruna, who died in 2002, was known for carrying a tape-recorder wherever he went. He needed to do this, he said because politicians many times lied to him.

Kidnapping

On September 30, eve of the election, a group of Colinas Indians kidnapped seven people: two military policeman and five others who had been drafted to work for the elections. The abduction occurred in Juruá, a city 1,000 km. from Manaus, the capital of Amazonas state.

According to a director of the National Election Board, Athayde Fontoura, "The Indians wanted to swap the hostages for food and gas, but they didn’t get anything." 

The state Military Police and the electoral justice were called, but the kidnapping only ended after the intervention of the Funai, the National Indian Foundation.

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

How to Become a Carioca

Postcards from Rio People are not pedestrians here, they are targets. Traffic signals are ...

U.S. Snow: ‘Delighted for Brazilian Friends’

I was pleased to hear the announcement by my counterpart in Brazil, Finance Minister ...

Brazilian Booming Stock Market Gives 15% Return in January

For the second day in a row, Brazilian stocks closed this Tuesday, January 31, ...

Brazil Gets Tough on Haitians and Only 2 (Two) Visas Are Granted

Brazil, on January 13, announced measures to limit the number of Haitians entering the ...

Bulgaria Can’t Get Enough of Brazil’s Presidential Candidate Rousseff

Brazil and Bulgaria are worlds apart. Bulgaria is a small eastern European nation with ...

Rio Slum Taken from Druglords Gets a Two-Mile Cable Car System

Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff inaugurated a cable car system in the Rio slum of ...

Sugar Production Grows 32% in Paraní¡, Brazil

Sugar production in the state of Paraná, in southern Brazil, during the first nine ...

Embraer Denies It’s Getting Subsidies from Brazilian Government

Latin American shares were mixed to lower this Friday, pressured by a fall in ...

Maniac for Education

Listening to Brazil’s new Education Minister: I have always dreamed of becoming the Minister ...

Elections in Quibocó

Together with two other policemen, Ofrênio went to the place and confirmed the fact: ...