Brazil’s Rich-Poor Gap Shrinks and So Does Everyone’s Income

The latest numbers from the IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics) show that in 10 years, between 1995 and 2005, Brazilian workers had their earnings cut by 12.7% (even though they had a 4.6% increase in income when compared to 2004), while the country’s unemployment rate jumped 52.5%.

In 2005, Brazilian men had a monthly average income of 909.10 reais (US$ 421), while women made in average 718.80 (US$ 333). Also in 2005, 56.4% of workers were men while 43.6% were women. In ten years the participation of women in the job market grew by 3.2%.

The IBGE’s report also points out that despite the higher unemployment more Brazilians are being hired on the books, which gives them bigger social benefits like social security and the right to unemployment benefits. The number of those formally hired went from 43.2% in 1995 to 47.2% ten years later.

In 1995, most of the jobless had between five and eight years of study. Ten years later people who have finished high school are the ones with the hardest time to get a job.

Another reason for encouragement is the narrowing of the gap between the top rich and the bottom poor. While in 1995 the difference in income between the top 10% and the bottom 40% was 21.2 times this number had fallen to 15.8 times by 2005.

The South was the region where the biggest reduction in inequality occurred. In the state of Piauí­, in the Northeast, however, the gap between rich and poor grew by 8.5%.
 
The news on youth unemployment isn’t good though. The IBGE study reveals that the number of jobless youngsters in the 18 to 24 age bracket has zoomed 68%.

In the ten-year period, the number of children aged 10 to 14 who are working fell from 20.4% to 11.5% and from 50.9% to 41.3% among youngsters between 15 and 17.

On the other hand, those 10- to 14-year-old kids are now 97% of them on school, while only 89.8 % were going to school ten years ago. For those between 15 and 17 82% now are studying in comparison to 66.6% ten years ago.

On the other end of the age spectrum the number of older people working has been shrinking. Only 34.4% of man aged 65 or older have a job now while this percentage was 40.5% in 1995.

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

Another Day of Chaos and Heartache for Brazil’s Varig Ticket Holders

The new Varig plan to cancel all domestic and international flights with the exception ...

Brazil Plans on Taking on the World with Baseball Caps

Brazil’s baseball cap capital, which is how the city of Apucarana is known, located ...

In Brazil Beef Exports Are Up, But Prices Are Down

A study released earlier this month by the Brazilian Confederation of Agriculture (CNA) shows ...

Activists Urge Brazil to Stop Killing of Amazon Dolphins

Activists from the Friends of the Manatee Association (Ampa) have placed a 12-meter-tall inflatable ...

PSDB’s Serra to Manage Brazil’s Largest City

The mayor-elect of São Paulo, Brazil, José Serra (PSDB), defeated his rival, incumbent mayor ...

Biotech Crops Curb Erosion and Pollution in the US and Brazil, Says GM Crowd

Since the introduction of biotech crops in 1996, farmers have reduced – and, in ...

90% of Brazil’s Sewage Is Dumped Untreated In Rivers and Lakes

Wednesday, March 22, on World Water Day, a director of a Brazilian NGO, SOS ...

No Apologies Necessary

Brazil has its problems, but that’s not something that anyone has to wear as ...

Brazil Adopts 99 Measures to Stem US$ 30 Billion in Losses to Piracy

Brazil’s National Council to Combat Piracy and Intellectual Property Violations (CNCP) unanimously approved, March ...

Brazil Consumes 30% More Fish. But It’s Still 18 Lbs Per Capita a Year

In two years, the average consumption of fish in Brazil increased about 30%, going ...