The End of the Plastic Bag As Seen from Brazil

Brazilian ecological bag People all over the world are becoming aware of a serious environmental problem: the disposal of plastic bags, which pollutes rivers and streams, clogging drain pipes. The issue is still controversial, but some countries have already adopted drastic policies, such as Ireland, which has imposed a 15% tax on plastic bags.

In Bangladesh, the bags were banished altogether. A plastic bag might take up to 500 years to decompose. Every year, from 500 billion to 1 trillion plastic bags are consumed worldwide, and the vast majority ends up in the garbage.

In the southeastern Brazilian city of São Paulo, according to the São Paulo State Supermarket Association (Apas), around 66 million small plastic bags are consumed per month at supermarkets.

The controversy has attracted the interest of entrepreneurs, to whom the substitution of plastic bags represents a good business opportunity, obviously coupled with environmental preservation.

One such company, Gatto de Rua (Street Cat), from the city of Santos, in the São Paulo coastline, has recently launched the Bag Market, a multitask bag that covers up shopping carts and renders plastic bags useless.

Sold by the company for 80 Brazilian reais (approximately US$ 43) retail, the product is already a success in São Paulo, and has become the flagship of the company.

According to Mário Gaspar, a partner at the company, the aim is not to put an end to plastic bags, but rather to offer customers an opportunity to help preserve the environment.

"It took us four years to develop and perfect the product. The Bag Market is made of fabric-non-fabric (TNT, in the Portuguese acronym) and divided into three compartments: one for food, another for hygiene, and a third one for frozen products."

Gaspar explains that the bag can last up to five years, and was developed for large and medium-sized shopping carts. The bags are available for retail sales in beige colour, but Gatto de Rua can manufacture the bags as promotional items in various colors.

"We have placed the product in the market in March, and since then we have been conducting surveys with supermarket owners, consumers, and managers. The feedback was great. The bag reduces time standing in line, and is a good-looking item."

Sebrae

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  • Show Comments (6)

  • Paul Masterson

    Compostable bags already available
    .

    There has been a Bioplastic available for years, made from potato starch and Natureworks PLA it is 100% certified biodegradable and more importantly 100% compostable in a home compost heap or bin in weeks.

    This Bioplastic is made by Biotec GmbH of Germany and sold by its 50/50 parent companies Stanelco PLC of the UK and Groupe Sphere of France. Stanelco are selling this plastic to Indaco of Canada and Biopak of Australia. Groupe Sphere use the Bioplastic to make bags of their own, they sell some via their Canadian distributor Al-Pack. Groupe Sphere currently sell 150,000 tonnes of plastic bags per annum, and they are changing the whole lot to this Bioplastic. All that is needed to change a plastic bag manufacturer to this Bioplastic is a small adjustment to the temperature of the melt, as Bioplastic has a lower melting point than petroplastic this also saves energy.

    http://www.biotec.de

    http://www.stanelcoplc.com

    http://www.stanelco.devisland.net (shareholders site and forum)

    http://www.sphere.eu

    This page shows that the Groupe Sphere bags and Biotec Bioplastics are available in Brazil, because they have a factory or office there, although I haven’t found the address yet those in Brazil should be able to do this easier from their end.
    http://www.sphere-nederland.nl/spheregroep.htm
    SPHERE BRAZIL (BRAZILIE)

    http://www.spmbiel.es

    http://www.sphere-nederland.nl

    http://www.alfaplas.co.uk

    http://www.biotec-distribution.eu

    http://www.bioplast.co.il

    http://www.biopak.com.au

    http://www.biosolo.com/1-welcome1.html

    Company : Indaco Manufacturing, Inc
    Contact : Peter Wehrle

    Films and bags with a maximum thickness of 1.5 mils produced by Indaco from StanelcoÀ¢€™s Starpol NS (GF1406) and Starpol 2000 (GS2189). Products will be sold under the tradename À¢€œBag-TO-NATURE.À¢€Â

    http://www.bpiworld.org/BPI-Public/Approved/1.html

    .

  • Nantwich dentist

    Eco-Friendly Bags
    Right use of plastic bag should be completely replaced by eco-friendly paper bags as it is hygienic as well as can be recycled or disposed easily.

  • Ric

    Commenting On Your Comment
    I donÀ‚´t know why I took the time to read the article, comment, read your comment, and now, comment on it.

    But I agree with your take on this, JoÀƒ£o.

  • João da Silva

    [quote]I am quite certain the plastics industry will come up a bag that decomposes faster. Rendering the bring your bag trade useless.[/quote]

    A few years ago, I read that a Kentucky based firm was making corn based product to make the plastic degrade faster. I think that the technology must be more advanced by now.

    As Jeff put it correctly, it is an example of a “nanny state”.

    btw, I dont even know why I bothered to read and comment on this article 🙁

  • Jeff

    ?
    43 dollars for a bag to haul stuff. Good luck with that. This is an example of the nanny state. I am quite certain the plastics industry will come up a bag that decomposes faster. Rendering the bring your bag trade useless. Notice how they need the government to either ban or heavily tax plastic for them to even have a business

  • Ric

    Cascola, Alba Ind. e Com.
    Without plastic sacks, how will the kiddies sniff their daily contact cement?

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