Brazil Hopes to Lead in Alcohol Exports Thanks to Kyoto

Prospects for the sugar and alcohol sector were discussed yesterday, September 2, in Brazil, by producers, politicians, and government representatives at the seminar “Brazil and Energy in the 21st Century: Sugar and Alcohol,” in the Ministry of Foreign Relations, in the capital BrasÀ­lia.

Brazil, which is the world’s largest producer of sugar cane, also hopes to lead in alcohol exports in 2005, availing itself of the potential opportunities made possible by acceptance of the Kyoto Protocol by the majority of the world’s countries.


The protocol, which is scheduled to go into effect on February 16, 2005, is an international treaty to limit greenhouse gas emissions in developed countries and, at the same time, encourage the adoption of a less polluting development model by developing countries.


This year, sugar and alcohol exports should earn Brazil around US$ 3 billion, 32% more than in 2003. In the case of alcohol alone, exports should amount to 2.2 billion liters.


According to figures released by Ambassador Mário Vilalva, director of the Ministry of Foreign Relations’ Department of Trade Promotion, Brazil is currently the world’s largest producer of sugar cane, 50% of which is used to manufacture ethanol.


He went on to say that the country has processed a large quantity of sugar cane: 357 million tons in the 2003/2004 harvest, yielding 28 million tons of sugar and 15 billion liters of alcohol.


During the seminar, the Secretary of Petroleum and Gas in the Ministry of Mines and Energy, Maria das Graças Foster, informed that Brazil expects to attain self-sufficiency soon in petroleum, producing the equivalent of 2.2 million barrels per day in coming months.


According to her, this represents 200 thousand barrels a day more than the country needs.


“We are experiencing a moment of considerable satisfaction and great tranquillity, represented by our self-sufficiency in petroleum. We currently import something on the order of 200 thousand barrels a day,” she said.


Agência Brasil
Translator: David Silberstein

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazilian Presidential Candidate Sampaio: Always Moving to the Left

Plínio de Arruda Sampaio recently turned 80 (born on July 26, 1930). He graduated ...

When Is Tithe Time This Brazilian Church is Asking: Credit or Debit Card?

Starting Monday, October 6, parishioners from a Catholic church in Brazil will be able ...

74% of Jobs Created in Brazil in January Came from Small Companies

In Brazil, micro and small companies were responsible for 74% of the 181,419 new ...

WTO Panel Rules Against US on a Case of Brazilian Orange Juice

A dispute settlement panel from the World Trade Organization has ruled that the United ...

Brazil Puts Desktops in Every One of Its 5,560 Cities. Over 350.000 of Them

Brazil is installing 356,800 virtualized desktops in schools in all of Brazil's 5,560 municipalities. ...

Want to Sell to the Chinese? Brazil Can Help.

Small and medium-sized Brazilian firms interested in selling their products on the Chinese market ...

That Lady on the Money

In the 112 years since the Proclamation of the Republic, Brazil has had scores ...

Brazil’s Petrobras Has Big Plans to Take on the World

Brazilian oil giant Petrobras expands investments and seeks joint venture in the US. Nestor ...

Made in Brazil Is Common Sight in Qatar’s Malls and Markets

In the supermarkets of Qatar, the words chicken and Brazil are very close. Brazilian ...