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Subject: 500-Year Celebration


Posted by liz grumet
On Sunday, May 28, 2000 at 00:58:39

Message:
Hi. I have read that for the 500-year celebration there were plans to reenact the voyage that took place from Portugal to Brazil. Did this actually happen? Also, I read that the National Commission for the Discovery of Brazil made plans for a memorial of the first encounter in santa Cruz Cabralia county in the state of Bahia between the conquerors and the indigenous peoples of Brazil. The focus of the project was to provide better living conditions for the Pataxo' Indians that currently live on the land by designating the surrounding areas as federal reservations composed of residential villages, schools and a community center. Did this actually happen? Were serious efforts put out in respect to the indigenous peoples of Brazil? How much was done during the celebrations to celebrate the diversity of indigenous peoples in Brazil? I am very curious about this so I hope someone has an answer.
Thanks a lot...Liz
RE: 500-Year Celebration
Posted by andris walter
On Tuesday, June 27, 2000 at 19:07:07

Message:
Liz, I was there and it was lame! They closed off the entry point a half hour outside Porto Seguro so that not even bands could get through for the celebration. If you bought a ticket for an excursion to arrive after friday evening, you were effectively blocked out of PS.
As for the encounter with the indians, it was anything but friendly. The MST organization was peacefully demonstrating and making its point but continually had problems with the police. The tension that something was going to go wrong was way high and since the presidents of portugal and brazil as well as all the dignitaries were in one place, well--they decided to close the offical celbration off to the public. Nice of them, huh?
People who lived there were rightfully pissed off yet happy to have the boost in tourism, to be sure. We got the feeling that PS is a hungry tourist trap of sorts, though it's amazingly beautiful.
Unfortunately, I felt the indigenous people's position was marginalized by the gov't and the media and as is so often the case, it fell by the wayside. I wonder what the MST is doing now..
RE: 500-Year Celebration
Posted by andris walter
On Tuesday, June 27, 2000 at 19:10:26

Message:
Liz, I was there and it was lame! They closed off the entry point a half hour outside Porto Seguro so that not even bands could get through for the celebration. If you bought a ticket for an excursion to arrive after friday evening, you were effectively blocked out of PS.
As for the encounter with the indians, it was anything but friendly. The MST organization was peacefully demonstrating and making its point but continually had problems with the police. The tension that something was going to go wrong was way high and since the presidents of portugal and brazil as well as all the dignitaries were in one place, well--they decided to close the offical celbration off to the public. Nice of them, huh?
People who lived there were rightfully pissed off yet happy to have the boost in tourism, to be sure. We got the feeling that PS is a hungry tourist trap of sorts, though it's amazingly beautiful.
Unfortunately, I felt the indigenous people's position was marginalized by the gov't and the media and as is so often the case, it fell by the wayside. I wonder what the MST is doing now..
RE: 500-Year Celebration
Posted by andris walter
On Tuesday, June 27, 2000 at 21:50:27

Message:
Liz, I was there and it was lame! They closed off the entry point a half hour outside Porto Seguro so that not even bands could get through for the celebration. If you bought a ticket for an excursion to arrive after friday evening, you were effectively blocked out of PS.
As for the encounter with the indians, it was anything but friendly. The MST organization was peacefully demonstrating and making its point but continually had problems with the police. The tension that something was going to go wrong was way high and since the presidents of portugal and brazil as well as all the dignitaries were in one place, well--they decided to close the offical celbration off to the public. Nice of them, huh?
People who lived there were rightfully pissed off yet happy to have the boost in tourism, to be sure. We got the feeling that PS is a hungry tourist trap of sorts, though it's amazingly beautiful.
Unfortunately, I felt the indigenous people's position was marginalized by the gov't and the media and as is so often the case, it fell by the wayside. I wonder what the MST is doing now..

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