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Lula Fights Charges of Illiteracy and Rudeness with Sarcasm and Charm

Lula Talks
Irony was the weapon used by Brazilian president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva to respond to criticism about his democratic credentials and lack of study leveled against him by his predecessor in the presidency, Fernando Henrique Cardoso and singer composer Caetano Veloso. Veloso called Lula illiterate, tacky and rude . Cardoso described Lulism as a kind of subPeronism.

"For an intellectual to keep watching a worker who only finished fourth grade win everything he wanted to have won and did not get for incompetence is certainly very difficult," said the president, in   a very direct rebuke of Cardoso, during a speech that lasted 1 hour and 43 minutes.

At the start of his speech to thousands of activists from the PCdoB (Communist Party of Brazil), who interrupted the president several times with applause and screams of approval, Lula, with Dilma Rousseff, his chief of staff, at his side said in a playful tone:

"Dilma is raring to take my place." And then added: "Dilma is the person who is going to give continuity to our project."

Both Lula and Rousseff used the national congress of the PCdoB (Communist Party of Brazil) to attack the opposition and to get votes for the 2010 presidential campaign. Rousseff was handpicked by Lula to succeed him.

Without mentioning the singer's name Lula also sent Veloso a message:

"There are people who think that intelligence is linked to how many years someone spends in school. There's nothing more stupid than that. College gives you knowledge. Intelligence is something else. And politics is one of the sciences that require more intelligence than knowledge. Intelligence to know how to put together a team, to take decisions,  is not found inside books, but through character and sensibility. Anyway, life is like that. People say what they want and hear what they don't want. Life is tough."

Veloso, on a November 5 interview to daily O Estado de S. Paulo, called the president an illiterate person and said that, unlike former Environment minister and presidential hopeful Marina Silva and US president Barack Obama, Lula doesn't know how to talk.

Lula continued his talk with a large dose of sarcasm: "A country governed by an illiterate man is going to end up being the administration that has invested the most in education. We are going to end our government with 14 new federal universities. We are doing one and a half more than they did in a century. I know that this is insufferable. Fernando Henrique Cardoso thought we would be a failure and that he would be able to come back."

The president told then that he was leaving the presidency to his chief of staff, Dilma Rousseff. "The king is dead. Long live the king," he added. "After that, I who got only to fourth grade, maybe I'll be able now to join the ProUni (the University for All program created by his administration)."

More then once he came back to the subject of intelligence and lack of it: "If there is something intelligent is the working class. There are many intellectuals in Brazil who don't believe that. (…) This week I was called an illiterate and this same week I got the title of statesman of the year." He was referring to the prize he just got in Great Britain, the Chatham House award from London's Institute of International Affairs

"There are presidents who went to study two, three years overseas. Not me." Contrary to other presidents, Lula said, he had to prove he was competent from the day he was born. "It was clear to me that if we failed, it would take another 150 years for another worker to become president."

Lula told a story about a meeting he had with paper pickers when he told to one of the men, "you can be the president of this country because we are going to leave a legacy."

He then talked about the pressure against his international policy. "They wanted me to hit Evo Morales. Evo wanted the gas that belonged to him. I could have used bravado with him, since Bolivia is a smaller country. But I could not see how a metal worker from São Bernardo (the city where Lula became a union leader) would want to fight with the president of Bolivia. I wanted to fight with Bush but he became my friend and I never had to fight with him."

Commenting on criticism over the Itaipu hydroelectric and the treaty review he signed with Paraguay, the Brazilian president explained: "There were those who said that the president wouldn't get into a fight with Paraguay because he was weak  How is it possible that a country the size of Brazil and with Brazil's wealth goes into a fight with Paraguay? I preferred to build a agreement that will give Paraguay a chance to develop."

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  • Show Comments (36)

  • Leo Bonneville

    Lula MVP of the Decade..
    WOW, no man has done more for his country than Lula did for Brazil, well, perhaps a few but Lula’s accomplishment will go down in the History books, Brazilians will surely miss him and I do believe that if a President is driving the Country.

    The COUNTRY would benefit tremendously by having him eligible for a 3rd term, people would vote him in again, I’m sure of it, and Brazil would have one of the best leader’s in history, with great credentials around the globe, governing them, it’d make sure things get done in Brazil, and improve things for Brazilians and Foreigners.

    Leo Bonneville

  • asp

    adrian, this mule head does understand the differance …..
    from stalanism and communist parties in brazil. as a matter of fact olinda has or had a really cute mayor who was from the communist party who i would have loved to sit down and explain to her why it is wrong

    the problem is they all start reading off the same page when they talk about capatalism and the usa….

    when that dogma starts creaping into the picture, the conversation might as well be over because they turn into robots who just dont see the realities and flaws of their ideologies

    its like talking to extreme evangelical christians or muslims or jewish holly book babblers…you just cant talk logicly

    im not saying you cant point out what is wrong with hyper capatalism or criticise the usa, its just that it gets into fantacy land if every thing wrong with the world is capatalism and the usa and every one else is the victom and we cant look at the very real flaws and failed experiments of communism that are so prevalent in world history

  • João da Silva

    [quote]Now you know my American blood has problems referring to anyone as ‘noble’. Actually, both families are of the Bahian style middle class. Both were (are) paying their way through private school.[/quote]

    Lots of Brasilians who have had good Public School Education have the same problems like you have to refer to anyone as noble. In fact, I know plenty of “Nobility” that went through the public schools and became teachers in the schools or professors in the Federal universities. Some even got their doctoral degrees in U.S., Canada and U.K (Heaven forbid!).

    [quote]I only made the point, wondering whether individual members of the military, indoctrinated by the military’s education, might be tempted to engage in their own defense of their private “law and order”, but using military resources.[/quote]

    Indoctrinated by the “MilitaryÀ‚´s education”? I dont know, Dr.McCray if your statement is valid. Should talk to some professors of IME/ITA to get additional clarifications. You shouldn’t base your judgment on the opinion of those erudite scholars from USP, UFBR, UNICAMP, etc;

    [quote]This is a point that I actually wanted to impress upon Asp because communism as manifested by Brazilian groups bare little resemblance to the International and totalitarian communism of the Soviets.[/quote]

    Hope our good friend ASP listens to your advice. 😉 He is slightly mule headed though.

    [quote]it’s the Civil Police who do forensic investigations (the pericias), remove bodies, handle prisoners, etc and they coordinate with the PM when they have to go into an area with gunfire.[/quote]

    In our state it is the same, but our Civil Police and PM are much more efficient, though they get massacred by the press all the time. I have no complaints against the Policia civil nor PM, though I think that they could take more “energetic measures” against the law breaking citizens. Just like Ricardo Amaral mentioned in the sister magazine. 😀

  • Adrianerik

    Correction
    I should have wrote “a friend’s ex-boyfriend”.

    Now you know my American blood has problems referring to anyone as ‘noble’. Actually, both families are of the Bahian style middle class. Both were (are) paying their way through private school.

    I only made the point, wondering whether individual members of the military, indoctrinated by the military’s education, might be tempted to engage in their own defense of their private “law and order”, but using military resources.

    Regarding the PCdo B…I was only making a rhetorical statement. In Salvador, Olivia Santana, a well-know black Brazilian and long time vereador is the force behind the PCdo B. This is a point that I actually wanted to impress upon Asp because communism as manifested by Brazilian groups bare little resemblance to the International and totalitarian communism of the Soviets.

    In Salvador, it’s the Civil Police who do forensic investigations (the pericias), remove bodies, handle prisoners, etc and they coordinate with the PM when they have to go into an area with gunfire.

  • João da Silva

    Adrianerik
    Sorry Adrian for my late reply,but I am sure we would catch up with each other in another thread!

    [quote]Joao – Constitutional law is Obama’s forte.[/quote]

    Yes. I vaguely remember that he was also the Editor of HLR and a student of of a famous Brasilian ,Mangabeira Unger who dedicated two years of his precious time to our “long range planning”. I guess both the Americans and Brasilians now understand about the “constitutional laws” and similar issues. 😉

    [quote]Is the only difference between Lei 69 and Lei 97 the chapter (IV) stipulating budget?[/quote]

    No. Lei 97 authorizes our armed forces to act as policemen at the frontiers as well as in the large urban areas. Only difference is that their members can be tried only in military tribunals for any “excesses” committed during the “execution” of their duties, whereas the Feds, PMs and Policia civil ( I really dont understand what their functions are) are to go before the civilian judges, hiring their own lawyers. I am waiting for more clarifications on this lei complimentar and if I get, shall pass on to ya. But to me it seems to be a nice way to clear the favelas in Rio. 😀

    [quote]In Salvador, a friend’s ex-boyfriend was threatened by her ex-boyfriend. When notified, her father, a sargent (sp) in the military showed up at her place with several members of his unit, armed to the teeth, ready to hunt down this boy who threatened her. (in the absence of protection of women in Bahia, that might have been a good idea).[/quote]

    This ex-boyfriend is poor or belongs to the noble family of Salvador. Please clarify. 😉

    [quote]Now, if the PCdoB were to win a few governorships, would that qualify as a possible threat to Brazil’s “law and order”?
    [/quote]

    I don’t think so. If the states want to elect candidates from PC do B, it is their right. We had a Mayor and nobody objected and finally got rid of that “weeping philosopher” through ballots. My only hope is that those who elected their PC do B don’t come rushing to our state alleging that their governors are no good , absolutely selfish and do not want to improve the lives of their “eleitores”.

    Oh, Adrian, our fearless Waldir Pires is from your state is still in PC do B or has he switched to another party? He did a wonderful job as the Minister of Defense, wouldn’t you agree with me? 😉 😀

  • asp

    i agree with your take on lula, adrian…
    and interesting insight into how the people in the peripheria think of people in the nobre barrio….and the nobre barrio people think about the people in the peripheria

    i fear it represents an ominous reality that is the crux of some of the real problems that have to be dealt with

    quite a take on intellectual’s contributions to history ….for sure ive noted the recent people who tanked the usa all were products of the most lofty universities the country has to offer

  • Adrianerik

    LEI COMPLEMENTAR CHAPTER 1?
    [quote]
    Adrian, pay a little bit of attention to lei complementar 97 and tell us what you think[/quote]

    Joao – Constitutional law is Obama’s forte. 😉

    I assume you are referring to the individual initiatives of any branch of the military to maintain “law and order”. (Chapter 1 and more detailed in Chapter V).

    Is the only difference between Lei 69 and Lei 97 the chapter (IV) stipulating budget?

    I don’t know, Joao…there is danger in leaving the definition of “law and order” up to the military. Don’t you think? J Edgar Hoover and Richard Nixon violated basic tenets of the American Constitution based upon their personal interpretation of law and order.

    Since the LEI also leaves it up to the military to design the education which orients their soldiers as to what their national mission is, I wonder how much of that “independent initiative” affects their behaviour.

    In Salvador, a friend’s ex-boyfriend was threatened by her ex-boyfriend. When notified, her father, a sargent (sp) in the military showed up at her place with several members of his unit, armed to the teeth, ready to hunt down this boy who threatened her. (in the absence of protection of women in Bahia, that might have been a good idea).

    In Nigeria, the son of a military officer was robbed as he left the airport by a taxi driver who was in partnership with members of the local police. They beat up his son and threw him in their prison. The military officer showed up with members of his troops, surrounded the police station and, I’m not quite sure of the numbers, killed a number of the policemen in a shootout.

    Now, if the PCdoB were to win a few governorships, would that qualify as a possible threat to Brazil’s “law and order”?

    You know that we “guests” have to be careful in our analysis/criticism of another country’s constitution….or their national football team. Could be deported!

  • Brazuca

    A tale told by a fool…
    …full of sound and fury, and signifying nothing! 😥

  • dnbaiacu

    Joao,,so right!
    [quote]

    I will let you decide!! What you wrote about Hitler and the “Volksvisch” proves my theory that he was just a “Laranja”. I bet our friends DnB (He is an Afro-American-Brasilian), Dr.Lloyd Cata, Forrest, Vinny, etc; would be LTAO[/quote]

    😉 😉 😉 😉
    I take none to this political stuff seriously. At the end of the day after a few dunks and a shower these folks are just humans with jobs. Us individuals only need to concern ourselves with the outcome as we carefully navigate through the interim. I carefully read the “script” to see how much time I have left to work out my salvation. It is really that simple.
    I am looking forward to seeing any comments of substance on the first article today on the “Iranian infitration” spoken of by Perez of Israel.. I doubt few understand the underlying implications of these events.
    The elite created Lula and what he represents. Whatever ridiculous comments they make on his education etc are inconsequential. Just fodder for the rest of us to eat up and be distracted by. And if the elite that make these comments REALLY think in their hearts that is important,, it just further proves the point that they are just rich people performing a job, blindly doing what they do,, weilding power. They could really care less about their constituents.And insult their intelligences with dumb comments like this that have virtually nothing to do with the real GAME. Actors in business suits that have studied law.That’s what they are.
    The sad part being that millions trust them. 🙁

  • dnbaiacu

    I’m surprised Joao.
    [quote]

    If I recall my history lessons correctly, Hitler, Stalin, Mao Che Dung and Pol Pot were not graduates of Ivy league colleges or trained in Sorbonne[/quote]

    You KNOW that all that matter is who FINANCED those idiots. 😉

  • USA_Male

    Double-Dot
    [quote]Ah been criticized many times by ya for trying to sell F-18s to our Brazilian friends .[/quote]
    My criticism of you was for you letting “ya friend” Slimebucket Costinha verbally defecate all over our great country.

    [quote]Ah must say that you are interfering in their domestic affairs, unless you are working hard to get a fat contract from that fella of your choice to run his campaign.[/quote]
    The same way Brazilians were tripping over themselves to proclaim O-BAM-A the next savior of the world and Amer/LatAm relations.

    [quote]Dont ya think the Brazilians are fully capable running their own campaign, without yr unsolicited advice. [/quote]
    Don’t you think people with a defeatist third world mentality can hate America without you sitting by their side apologizing with a nod and a wink?

  • Double-Dot

    US_Male
    Ah been criticized many times by ya for trying to sell F-18s to our Brazilian friends . Now ya give a big lecture to them whom they should elect as their next President. Ah must say that you are interfering in their domestic affairs, unless you are working hard to get a fat contract from that fella of your choice to run his campaign. Dont ya think the Brazilians are fully capable running their own campaign, without yr unsolicited advice.

    God bless America

  • João da Silva

    [quote]Regarding guillotines. Isn’t that part of what is happening in Brazil right now.[/quote]

    That was what I was talking about in my first entry in reply to your original comment. But I don’t think that the target will be the intellectuals and aristocrats. It will be the middle class educated but “non-intellectuals”. Where did the “intellectuals” go after the 1964? NYC, Paris, Santiago, Montevideo, Algiers, etc. To come back when it was safe and pay lip service to the “poor”. That is one of the reasons, I have no respect for FHC and his likes. The last “intellectual” who returned and spent two years and went back to his country of “exile” was Mangabeira Unger, because he knew it was a hopeless task.

    [quote]That’s what all three need to know of each other, including the posters on this thread who lambast Lula simply because he is not of their pedigree. There are other reasons to criticize Lula, but that is not one of them.
    [/quote]

    Agree. I don’t criticize him because of his lack of pedigree, but for “other” reasons one of which is his policies are no different from that of his predecessor.

    [quote]Even I was shocked when a friend said “I hate them! You see, Adrian, we work 6 days a week and have nothing! They see how we live and do nothing about it.”[/quote]

    Well, I am not shocked. But I think that they will continue voting for the ones who pay lip service to them. My prediction is that the honest, hard working , but voiceless middle class is going to be caught in the crossfire.

    Adrian, pay a little bit of attention to lei complementar 97 and tell us what you think.

  • USA_Male

    Dear Brazilians,if you are smart, pay attention how President Obama who talks similar like President Lula da Silva, though it’s a fact that President Lula da Silva has ruled the country like an authentic conservative (Fiscal discipline). While Obama who campaigned like “moderate” (whatever that is) he goes left and extreem left. Lula a leftist ex metal worker shoeshine boy, went right. I have to say..Amazing, the world is upside down.
    Though lula has failed to reform Brazil’s tax and labor system (the more flexibility, lower taxes and cut spending, the better, more wealth you create), Brazilians should move on and simply vote for a candidate who they believe in to keep the country moving the “right” way. Now remember, Government doesn’t create jobs, it’s the people from all classes who create jobs. what Government does is or actually must do is..give you the tools what you need to create jobs. tools like..govern the country with common sense and not wasting your tax money. Create confidence, that it’s safe for you to do what you must do for yourself or family or whatever..you name it.
    I read some comments here of inviduals who are bitching about how the rich is stealing the wealth and more bla bla bla about the rich. It’s time that those individuals understand that the rich are the people who create jobs. Jobs that the middle class need to improve their lifes and jobs what the poor class need to become the middle class and prosper in the long term. Jobs is the key word. While the US has lost jobs, Brazil gained. Lula’s conservative policies has worked. Now that he’s leaving, and chooses who should take his old job over, is in my opinion wrong, but he has the right to back a person who he believes in. Brazilian people should ignore it, not follow everything blind, because in good times it’s easy to follow a popular leader blind without question him why he backs up a certain person. Of course he will explain why he will do that, but you have a high chance he will explain his reasons by using words “you” love and want to hear, what can or is misleading if you take your time and think about it. It’s going to be very excited who will become next president of a nation, that in my opinion is doing the right things to prosper while my country is fading away because of over spending and big government. I think Jose Serra is the best candidate who believes in Fiscal discipline, cut wasteful spending, and lower taxes that helps Brazilian entrepreneurs ( the wealthy who some individuals bash without thinking), and foreing who invest in Brazil and create JOBS…and important cut wasteful spending, to keep a balance budget. We live in an interesting time where we all can learn that overspending, big government, free for all institutions, Zero procent interest rate, excessive shopping wth borrowed money imported goods from cheap labor, creating “only” a service industry (with the believe, you are the only one who can do that kind of job), and BAILOUT failed companies ( funny, the free marketeers in Europe, Japan and the USA bail out companies) = four words….a path to disaster.
    Vote for someone who works for you..because you do not work for him. If he or she doesn’t, big deal, fire him or her…next. If you are not involved, fine, nobody tells you that you must, but if something doesn’t work for you because of some policies, don’t bitch but face the consequence and fix it. This is how it works everywhere around the world.

  • Adrianerik

    laranja?
    I don’t know if I would call Hitler a ‘laranja’ any more that we, who accept the intellectual history of western judeo-christian culture are ‘laranja’s. There was ‘cultural gas’ for Hitler to ignite. And that’s what he did.

    So as not to get too deep and “major in the minors” the overall point, based upon the criticism of Lula SOLELY based upon his ‘type’ of education, is that formal education does not NECESSARILY make good, wise, visionary leaders. And that lack of ‘formal education’ does not necessarily mean the inability to govern effectively and with vision.

    World carnage through history has been equally shared by the ‘brutes’ and the ‘intellectuals’ and the so-called ‘god-inspired’. I was implicating one group above the other. Because much beauty in the world has also come from the ‘brutes’, the intellectuals and the god-inspired.

    That’s what all three need to know of each other, including the posters on this thread who lambast Lula simply because he is not of their pedigree. There are other reasons to criticize Lula, but that is not one of them.

    Regarding guillotines. Isn’t that part of what is happening in Brazil right now. Of course, it’s not on the scale of the slaughter that peasants perpetrated against the aristocrats after the fall of the Bastille. But aren’t there similarities. There was a legitimacy to the rage of the French peasants. However, under the urging of Robespierre, this rage was irrationally applied. Such as cutting off the heads of folks merely because they had ‘nice shoes’.

    You know, even being an American, I’ve been to more of the peripheral neighborhoods than most of my well-to-do friends in Salvador. (my well-to-do friends in Corredor do Vitoria (where the family of ACM lives) are shocked when I tell them about some of the neighborhoods I enter to do ‘things’. And the anger against the people in the “bairros nobre” is so thick that it can be cut with a knife. I’m not talking about drug dealers or moleques or piroguetes…I’m talking about usually quiet, tranquil folks — some of whom fear god — but who quiver with anger and most of whom can tell some tale of indignity they received from some “metido”. Even I was shocked when a friend said “I hate them! You see, Adrian, we work 6 days a week and have nothing! They see how we live and do nothing about it.”

  • João da Silva

    Adrian McCray
    Wow, thanks for the long reply. Is it Adrianerik or Adrian Erik McCray? 😉

    [quote]Joao…I don’t know when you are writing “tongue in cheek” or are serious.[/quote]

    I will let you decide!! What you wrote about Hitler and the “Volksvisch” proves my theory that he was just a “Laranja”. I bet our friends DnB (He is an Afro-American-Brasilian), Dr.Lloyd Cata, Forrest, Vinny, etc; would be LTAO.

    [quote]Secondly, the “eugenics” movement or the belief in “selective breeding” and its crueler side ‘selective extermination” was created by an “aristocrat” – Sir Francis Galton and supported by idiots such as Theodore Roosevelt, George Bernard Shaw, H.G. Wells and Winston Churchhill and the noted economist John Maynard Keynes.
    [/quote]

    The great Anglo-American-Judo Christian empire, eh? I just love your argument, since you have a point there!!!

    [quote]The Sorbonne…are you serious? (You Brazilians have this romanticism of a Sorbonne education. It reminds me of the snots who I run into who graduated from UFBA or USP who initially treats this “preto” like shit until I put them in their place.)[/quote]

    Re Sorbonne, if I am serious and I have this romanticism about Sorbonne education? Your guess is as good as mine. But you must admit that Sorbonne trained “intellectuals” are much better than the Anglos (or for that matter the Germans) in keeping the “criolos” in their right places. Re the “intellectuals” from UFBA, USP, or UNICAMP that treat you like a piece of shit just because you are a “NegÀƒ£o”, let me assure you that they consider themselves as the Brasilian version of Ivy League graduates (lately there is a split in their opinion-some dissidents belong to Sorbonne side) and treat the graduates from institutions like ITA/IME as idiots and filhotes of the “Ditadura Militar”. I am really sorry for the treatment you receive, but it shows the underlying racism in our society and how much importance we place on “education”.

    [quote]It was the Ivy League intellectuals who dominated the American economy just before the depression and it was their “aristocratic’ greed that brought on the Great Depression. Even during the midst of the Depression the Harvard Business School was still in denial of their own errors.
    [/quote]

    You are talking like our eminent scholar and fellow blogger Dr.Lloyd Cata! I hope he gets to read the exchange of our comments and has something to add with his customary wisdom and foresight. 😀

    [quote]Now…let me see…Greenspan went to Julliard, New York University…and Columbia University. An American aristocrat? [/quote]

    Or was Greenspan another “Laranja”? 😀 😉

    BTW, you haven’t answered my question regarding Mao Tche Dung. Was he a “laranja” too? If so, whose?

  • Adrian McCray

    The Sorbonne??
    Joao…I don’t know when you are writing “tongue in cheek” or are serious. I hope that you are joking. First of all, people like Hitler did not create Fascism. In history one should distinguish between the ideology/ideologue and the opportunists who take advantages of these ideologies. The belief in German superiority (volkvisch) and the intellectual attacks against liberal markets and materialism in favor of a submission of the individual motives to the state (fascism) were established by intellectuals in the late 19th century and were backbone of the fascist movements in the 20th century.

    Secondly, the “eugenics” movement or the belief in “selective breeding” and its crueler side ‘selective extermination” was created by an “aristocrat” – Sir Francis Galton and supported by idiots such as Theodore Roosevelt, George Bernard Shaw, H.G. Wells and Winston Churchhill and the noted economist John Maynard Keynes.

    Along with fascism, eugenics — the extermination side — was on the platform of many socialist/communist papers and used in their selective extermination activities. Only, included among the undesirables, they, such as Pol Pot (who adopted Stalin’s style of communism) included intellectuals as undesirables.

    The Sorbonne…are you serious? (You Brazilians have this romanticism of a Sorbonne education. It reminds me of the snots who I run into who graduated from UFBA or USP who initially treats this “preto” like shit until I put them in their place.)

    Yes…the Sorbonne has produced some great intellectuals. Actually, the roots of Left thinkers in France are graduates of the Sorbonne.

    Ivy League?

    First of all, Malcolm X was not a graduate of an Ivy League school and…oh…let me remember…he completely annihilated them in two televised debates. And, in another incarnation of my life, I liked Ivy League graduates, I always made sure that two of them were on my team (me with my second tier college education)

    Joking aside….it would be wise to study early 20th century American history and the Ivy League intellectuals who almost destroyed this country such as the Harvard sociologist who proposed that women were intellectually incapable of intellectual rigor. Nearly every church in America took up this nonsense and led to the oppression of women for decades. These same Ivy League “intellectuals?” provided much of the fodder for Darwin-based selection of the races which also fueled the climate for some of the most horrific extermination of peoples in history.

    It was the Ivy League intellectuals who dominated the American economy just before the depression and it was their “aristocratic’ greed that brought on the Great Depression. Even during the midst of the Depression the Harvard Business School was still in denial of their own errors.

    This was just repeated when Alan Greenspan, former chairmen of the Federal Reserve, sat before a Congressional Committee,who wanted answers about his failure to anticipate this financial crisis and the only thing that he could say was that
    “he was wrong and that 40 years of his fundamental beliefs in how the market operates was wrong”.

    Now…let me see…Greenspan went to Julliard, New York University…and Columbia University. An American aristocrat?

  • João da Silva

    [quote]The overwhelming majority of the millions slaughtered in the 20th century were annihilated by those belonging to the highly educated, so-called aristocratic class.[/quote]

    If I recall my history lessons correctly, Hitler, Stalin, Mao Che Dung and Pol Pot were not graduates of Ivy league colleges or trained in Sorbonne.

    [quote]For every bullet that Augustus ridiculously recommends there is a guillotine to lop the aristocratic heads of the arrogants.

    Why isn’t there one around when needed? [/quote]

    There are plenty around except that the death is not quick like the real guillotine.

  • Adrian McCray

    Educated? People
    The overwhelming majority of the millions slaughtered in the 20th century were annihilated by those belonging to the highly educated, so-called aristocratic class.

    The majority of the world’s “isms” (racism, sexism, classism) came out of the snot of intellectuals whose “intellectual masturbation” led to centuries of prejudice, massacres and domination.

    That PORTION of Brazil’s educated class who can ONLY criticize Lula based upon educational credentials (rather than policies) have no moral authority to assume that their class is the overlords of society or good government.

    For every bullet that Augustus ridiculously recommends there is a guillotine to lop the aristocratic heads of the arrogants.

    Why isn’t there one around when needed?

  • -JONY-

    Laura, this is not the case at all.
    ” That is what dictators do !
    They chose their successors ! “

    This is a very normal and logical thing to do. Every political party in the free world, position themselves by reaching a general consensus within their own party of who should be the candidate that would have the best chances to win an election. And that is what Lula is doing right now.
    At the end of the day, the brazilian people are the ones going to decide who should they vote for not Lula.

  • Cris Lopes

    Lula is the man!
    Barack Obama: “Lula is the man, he is the most popular politician in the planet!”

  • João da Silva

    Augustus
    [quote]I’m beginning to lose all faith for Brazil… [/quote]

    Not yet. Give another 12 months before coming to this conclusion!!!! 😉 😀 😉

    Cheers

  • AUGUSTUS SEVERUS

    DISGUSTED WITH THIS IGNORANT AND HIS PIT OF VENEMOUS VIPERS – Where is a stray bullent when one needs one wherever Lula goes…
    Speechless and disgusted by this man… I’m beginning to lose all faith for Brazil…

  • Rod

    I am Brazilian and I am very, very, pround to have Mr. Lula as the president of my Country….

  • Bambu

    the Monarch has determined that it is going to be a lady
    [quote]So how about GlÀƒ³ria Pires? [/quote]

    So how about Luciana Mello?

  • Bo


    [quote]Good choice.BUT…BUT… the Monarch has determined that it is going to be a lady. So how about GlÀƒ³ria Pires?[/quote]

    How about Juliana Paes?

  • João da Silva

    [quote] Renato Rabelo would be my choice.
    Isn’t he one of those damn commies? Mah word….too many damn commies.
    [/quote]

    Esteemed Double-Dot, may I humbly point out that you are confusing this Renato Rabelo with Aldo Rebelo who is indeed a hard core commie. 😉 😀 😉

  • Double-Dot

    Andrade
    [quote]The rich should be taxed more and the poor given more money.[/quote]

    What are you? Some kind of damn commie?
    Let Lula try and run for a 3rd term. He’ll end up like that commie Zelaya you people are holing up in yo embassy in Duras.

    God bless America

  • Double-Dot

    ———
    [quote]Renato Rabelo would be my choice.[/quote]

    Isn’t he one of those damn commies? Mah word….too many damn commies.

    God bless America

  • João da Silva

    [quote]Renato Rabelo would be my choice. [/quote]

    Good choice.BUT…BUT… the Monarch has determined that it is going to be a lady. So how about GlÀƒ³ria Pires?

  • Andrade

    Lula for a 3rd Term!
    Lula deserves a 3rd term. The rich should be taxed more and the poor given more money. The greedy rich have looted Brazil.
    Our brother Lula – the best president of Brazil!!

  • Leo Bonneville

    Who do you have in mind for the plum post of the P.M.?
    Renato Rabelo would be my choice.

    Leo Bonneville

  • Double-Dot

    At the start of his speech to thousands of activists from the PCdoB (Communist Party of Brazil), who interrupted the president several times with applause and screams of approval
    Those damn commies.

    God bless America

  • Laura

    “Dilma is raring to take my place.”
    That is what dictators do !
    They chose their successors !

    Kirchner, your cousin did the same !

  • João da Silva

    [quote]The COUNTRY would benefit tremendously by having him eligible for a 3rd term, people would vote him in again, I’m sure of it, and Brazil would have one of the best leader’s in history, with great credentials around the globe, governing them, it’d make sure things get done in Brazil, and improve things for Brazilians and Foreigners.
    [/quote]

    Well said Bonnerville. I share your thoughts fully. Our other distinguished and honorable fellow blogger Augustus is in favor of Monarchy.This is the right time to implement it. I strongly urge all the Brasilians to crown Lula as the King. Who do you have in mind for the plum post of the P.M.?

  • baba

    Lula has taken this country
    to where no other intellectual president has ever taken before. Like the popular saying goes… “for those who can’t practice it, they can only teach ” or preach.

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