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Sean Goldman’s Grandmother to File Another Lawsuit in US to See Boy

Sean Goldman showing his catch at the Trout Contest for Kids in April 2010 After a frustrated trip to the US to see her grandson Sean Goldman, Brazilian Silvana Bianchi decided to appeal to the American justice. The lawyers of the Brazilian family of the 9-year-old boy who was turned over to his American father on Christmas Eve last year and taken to the United States after a bitter custody battle, say they will act soon.

They intend the request the assistance of a Brazilian governmental agency called the Central Authority for Federal Affairs (“Autoridade Central para Assuntos Federais” – Acaf) in filing a lawsuit in a US court so the boy’s Brazilian relatives can visit him there.

According to the Brazilian grandparents, since the boy returned to the US they have been unable to see him. They went so far as to file a petition in a US court, but it was not granted.

“At this time we are trying a second route, that is, we will go through Brazilian authorities to get to the US authorities, basing our request on clauses in the Hague Convention [on Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction],” explained Carlos Nicodemos, one of the family’s lawyers.

Silvana Bianchi, the boy’s grandmother, says she has not spoken to Sean since March 2. “Before that I did speak to him a few times [by phone] but always under restrictions.

For example, I had to speak in English and could not mention certain subjects. I could not tell him about his stepsister and how much she misses him,” declared Ms Bianchi.

This week, on April 20, Ms Bianchi was in Brazilian capital BrasΓ­lia where she visited senator Cristovam Buarque (from the Workers Party of the Federal District) who is the chairman of the Senate Human Rights Committee.

She gave the senator a report on some of the irregular aspects of Sean’s departure from Brazil, such as the fact that he did not have a Brazilian passport.

Buarque told reporters that in his opinion Brazil had an obligation to ensure that the Brazilian grandparents could visit their grandson in the United States.

ABr

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  • Show Comments (10)

  • Mertin – Moron

    What’s in a name?
    [quote]Some Brazilians might argue that gringo isn’t insulting but as a person with northern European appearance who has lived in Brazil since I was 3 years old I know very well that it is not used in friendship.
    The sad thing about the term is that it actually reflects badly on Latin American culture, and on the user, because it has several negative connotations. It is used to imply the following:

    outsider; inexperienced; potential victim

    In identifying someone as a victim it implies dishonesty in the user, even when not intended as such
    [/quote]

    I am Brazilian and I have lived most of my life in Europe and every time I go back to Brazil to visit my beloved extended family, many times especially during the churrascos and partying, jokes arise and my family call me gringo..

    Do they mean outsider? Yes, do my own family mean potential victim ? NO..

    Gringo is a two sided-word with the main meaning as outsider/foreigner, the other meanings that come out from it, it all depends on the situation and how it’s being said…

    Mertin, if people call you a gringo implying that apart from being a foreigner you are also inexperienced that is because that’s their nicest way to tell you you are a moron !

  • Emily

    the gringo term
    I just like to say that it is true that the term gringo is not intended in a derogaroty way. However, the people that does use it (and there are many people who does) with a deogaroty intent is only reflecting their limited education.

  • Emily

    “you are desperate because the american dream doesn’t exist any more”

    Just to clarify, the american dream still exist and better than ever! It does not exist for those who cannot afford it to begin with, people that fell victim of the greety banks. But not everyone in America is having such predicament. Many are purchasing a home for the first time at great interest rates and great prices!! Many others are not affected at all because they own their homes from over a decade ago, thus their value is probably still higher.

    Yes there is economic trouble in American with the housing market but from there to say the American Dream does not exist anymore there is a HUGE difference. It does very well exist, speak to all the americans in the position to take advantage of the crash rathern than to those that got stuck in the crash. There are 250 million people in this country!

  • ….@

    To superpower: what about those americans english teachers illegals in Brazil? Don’t you think they need to get deported too? 46 americans don’t have health insurance and you blame those 12 millions illegals in the U.S. Are you part of Nazis Arizona? Believe me you need a mental doctor. I am not trying to make you embarrassed here or trying to win this argument. Really, believe me you need help. Maybe, you are desperate because the american dream doesn’t exist any more.

  • Mertin

    What’s in a name?
    Brasilia wrote: “I would also like to see the gringos who visit here and comment to stop bashing Brazil… …The same goes for the gringos, if you’ve never spent time in Brazil, you need to keep your mouths shut when speaking about the people and the country as a whole.

    The old adage of “If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all” applies to both sides.”

    While I agree with much that you said you undermine you message by repeatedly using derogatory names. You would hardy feel inclined to politeness if someone every second sentence were calling you spic, wop, greaseball, border monkey or wetback.

    Some Brazilians might argue that gringo isn’t insulting but as a person with northern European appearance who has lived in Brazil since I was 3 years old I know very well that it is not used in friendship.

    The sad thing about the term is that it actually reflects badly on Latin American culture, and on the user, because it has several negative connotations. It is used to imply the following:

    outsider; inexperienced; potential victim

    In identifying someone as a victim it implies dishonesty in the user, even when not intended as such. Having said that, I entirely agree that good manners is much more conducive to intelligent discourse than unpleasantness.

    Finally, while agree with you generally that positive comments are far more productive than negative ones you, if you are Brazilian, will know that Brazil is still much in need of a good dose of honest self-criticism. There is much to be improved about this country.

    Not least a legal system that can keep the Governor of Brasilia in jail.

  • superpower 1

    take them ,there yours…
    this should be a lesson for americans who marry foreign nationals looking for a “green card”,,,incidentally ,,,brazil is a high violater of u.s. immigration laws with 90% of brazilian nationals in the u.s.a Illegal……states with illegal brazilians are florida,New jersey,massachusetts,and connecticutt…As the noose tightens on illegal aliens in the u.s.and immigration authorities ramping up apprehensions and deportations it is expected that brazil and other offender nations ie:mexico,china,russia,etc. will be seeing a increase in the number of returning ,whores,thieves ,counterfeiters,deviants,and criminals..

  • Brasilia

    Questions with no answers…
    I’ve always wondered what was her reason for leaving Mr. Goldman in the first place. She obviously lied to him and said she was taking Sean to Brazil for a 2 week visit. Where we all know she divorced him and then married her lawyer boss. It is a shame she died in childbirth, as it seems the true reasons for running away have died with her. Mr. Goldman, Ms. Bianchi and Mr. Lins de Silva are unreliable in giving us all the truth behind these circumstances.

    I would however like to see the comments about “Slavery in America” and other negative commentary directed at the US, stop. Sean is a US citizen, whether you like it or not. He was not born in Brazil, the only ties he has to the country is a dead mother and a step family. If his mother had not married a very wealthy Rio lawyer, who could afford to send Sean to the best schools, Sean’s quality of life and education would be very suspect. Mr. Goldman did not steal Sean from Brazil, he merely got his son back who was stolen from him, by a woman who’s true motivations remain circumspect.

    Some of you act is if how Sean came to be in Brazil in the first place doesn’t matter. I can promise you, if the table had been flipped and Sean was a Brazilian citizen kidnapped to the US, you would be screaming bloody murder. You would be right to do so. There is a double standard at play here, which many of you will not admit exists. It is OK for you to demand the US bend to your will, but it is not OK for the US to do the same, even when this case is a clear violation of National & International Law. This is not the first time it has happened and it won’t be the last, there is always inherent risks in having children in a relationship/marriage between two adults from different countries. The majority do not end with spousal kidnapping, but a few cases do.

    I would also like to see the gringos who visit here and comment to stop bashing Brazil. The majority of Brazilians supported Sean being returned to his father. Most of them hate Ms. Bianchi and Mr. Lins de Silva, with all the stunts they have pulled throughout this ordeal. The baiting posts need to stop, especially when your knowledge of the US is limited to what you read in the papers and see on TV. The same goes for the gringos, if you’ve never spent time in Brazil, you need to keep your mouths shut when speaking about the people and the country as a whole.

    The old adage of “If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all” applies to both sides. πŸ™‚

  • Steve King

    Good. Let them waste even more of their money! If they had been prepared to abide by international laws and treaties, and return Sean to his father in the first place, then perhaps he might now be more willing to let them see him.

    Nowhere, please read that again, NOWHERE in law does the rights of a grandparent surpass the rights of a father. This boy should have bee returned to his father when the mother died. These people are just kidnappers, pure and simple!

    I have read rubbish on here about how the boy should have been left in Brazil because that is Β΄all he knowsΒ΄… Yeah, and why is that? Because he was kidnapped!

    I read that the boy should have been left with his grandparents and (step) father because they are well-off financially and they have more money than the natural father..

    WHAT??? So if someone is illegally kidnapped by someone with money, then years later they should be allowed to KEEP the kidnapped child? Because they are wealthy? Are you SERIOUS?

    I canΒ΄t wait to see the outcome of this case in the US… (remember that these people disobeyed US court rulings in the first place!) I hope this costs these Β΄wealthyΒ΄ people all of their money.. I hope they learn that (even in Brazil), you cannot do whatever you like, disobey international laws and treaties, just because you have money.

    You might be able to buy Β΄justiceΒ΄ in Brazil, let them try it in the rest of the world… Let them try it in America!

  • Olivia

    Quick correction
    Sean has a half sister, she’s not his “stepsister”. She’s the biological child of Sean’s mother and Sean’s stepfather. The same little girl he was seen playing with in the photos. She would miss him, she’s known him all her life.

  • fried chc

    There was a program on TV called “Slavery in America”
    This topic would make a great episode on that TV series.

    Costinha

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