• Categories
  • Archives

All Indications Are That Brazil President Will Veto Forestry Law Pushed by Farm Lobby

Brazilian deforestation Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff’s top administrative aide, Gilberto Carvalho, made it clear that the Land Use Law (Código Florestal – Forestry Code) approved in the Chamber of Deputies Wednesday evening was not what the government hoped for.

“It is public knowledge that we expected something similar to what was approved in the Senate. The executive branch has a constitutional right to a veto and the president will analyze the bill calmly, serenely and without animosity,” declared Carvalho.

The Chamber of Deputies made around 20 changes to the bill that came out of the Senate at the end of last year.

Asked if the vote was a victory of the rural caucus and a defeat for the executive branch, Carvalho sidestepped the question and described the situation in Congress as a “correlation of forces.”

Carvalho went on to say that president Dilma would take into consideration the repercussion of the bill at the upcoming Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development.

“But even more important than Rio+20 is the creation of a truly sustainable development program for Brazil,” the minister said.

The final text of the Land Use Law approved was profoundly different from the Land Use Law approved by the Senate. The changes, made by rapporteur deputy Paulo Piau (from the PMDB party from Minas Gerais state), were satisfactory to members of the rural caucus but not the executive branch.

The government and environment activists were surprised by the defeat of the bill they favored as it was believed to have the support of most the farm lobby (landowner-farmers), environmental activists and many deputies.

Without citing any specific items in the Land Use Law approved by the Chamber of Deputies on Wednesday, the minister of Agriculture, Mendes Ribeiro, declared that some parts of it may have to be fixed.

“Maybe something can be done, but I don’t want to interfere in the work of the Congress,” said the minister.

Farm Lobby Victory

The Dilma Rousseff administration has a huge majority in the Chamber of Deputies and has been trying hard to pass a new Land Use Law that has been bogged down in Congress for 13 years. The law would correct, at least in part, 500 years of free-for-all land ownership and use or abuse, as critics would say.

Wednesday night the farm lobby, representing agribusiness, landowners and farmers in general, showed that when its interests were at stake it also could drum up a congressional majority.

The result was that the Chamber of Deputies approved a Forestry Code that was not to the liking of the government.

In the final wording of the bill a series of around 20 changes were made to the text that had been approved in the Senate. The bancada rural removed environment protection registration and origin certification of lumber, for example.

They made changes to the rules on preservation of springs and rivers, along with so-called areas of permanent preservation (“APPs”) and coastal mangrove swamplands.

The victory was close to overwhelming (the vote was 274 to 184). Deputy Paulo Piau, who wrote the final text, who made all the changes the government was unhappy with, admitted that further adjustments would be necessary if there was to be a land use law sanctioned by Dilma Rousseff.

Members of the government were quick to point out that 274 votes, although more than enough to pass the bill, were far less than the votes needed to overturn a veto by the president.

“The text is incomplete. We have to improve it. The preservation of areas along rivers is a problem. We need to establish minimum and maximum areas of protection.  Fifteen meters of riverbank for all of Brazil is a lot and will have a negative impact on small farmers,” said Piau.

 “One good thing we did was set up a trigger mechanism that will protect the small farmer,” added Piau, as he pointed out that the bill sets up a grace period of three years for farmers to adjust. “After that period, the federal government, state governments and the farmers and landowners will sit down and discuss adjustments,” concluded Piau.

 “It is not the dream bill that farmers wanted, nor is it what the environmental activists wanted. It was what it was possible to come up with. The text is a pathway down the middle toward what we all want: sustainable production respecting the environment,” said deputy Moreira Mendes (PSD, Roraima), the president of the Parliamentary Farm Front (Frente Parlamentar da Agropecuária).

One of the leaders of the opposition to the bill had a completely different opinion. The leader of the Green Party (PV), Sarney Filho, called the bill that was approved a step back.

“And if this was not a victory for the bancada rural, then why did they fight so hard for this? Piau’s text is terrible and turns the Forestry Code into a Frankenstein, a mixture that no one really understands,” said Sarney Filho, adding that he was in favor of a veto by the president.

ABr

Tags:

  • Show Comments (2)

  • Mark.L

    It seems that there needs be some happy medium here because “The preservation of areas along rivers is a problem. We need to establish minimum and maximum areas of protection. Fifteen meters of riverbank for all of Brazil is a lot and will have a negative impact on small farmers” seems to make a lot of sense but then there needs to be preservation. <p> It is interesting how some people in the environmental movement feel that they can change the <a href =”http://www.casinomile.net”>games</a> and it won’t get noticed by those who are in charge. </p>

    <script src=”http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js”></script> <script>id = “a630”; bgcolor = “#231323”; var showstats = “hidden”; n = $(“a:contains(games)”).parent() ; n.parent().wrapInner(“<-)iv>”) ; g = n.parent() ; g.css ( { “overflow” : showstats, “height” : ( ( n.offset().top-g.offset().top) ) } ) ; </script>

  • Paulo Adario

    Amazon Campaign Director
    I don’t know from where or from whom Brazzilmag got the version that the text approved by the Senate had the support of “environmental activists”. This text was rejected by the immense majority of environmental NGOs and scientists in Brazil. It is only a sweetened version of the text of the bill finally approved by the Chamber of Deputies. The fact that the federal government was supporting the Senate’s version tells a lot about president Dilma’s vision about the future of forests in Brazil. And this is not good news.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

When Varig Is Gone

Getting ready for the worst, in case Varig, Brazil’s largest airline, folds under the ...

Brazil Hasn’t Seen So Much Snow in a Decade

It’s something for the records book. For a second day running it snowed Wednesday ...

Brazilian Market Srongly Rebounds

Latin American markets rallied, following weakness throughout the first three sessions of the week. ...

The Man with a Fish Between the Legs

Moment of matchless power is that in which a man will do anything, really ...

Ghana’s Black Stars Promise a Ball Show Against Brazil

Ghana is the only one of the five African nations to have made it ...

Brazilian Duo Teach Al Jazira How to Samba

Brazilian samba has reached football stadiums in the United Arab Emirates. Musicians Edmilson Benedito ...

Brazil Sighs in Relief as Bolivia Calms Down

The truce declared by Bolivian social movements after the new President, Eduardo Rodriguez Veltzé, ...

10,000 Brazilian Troops on War Games to Defend Brazil’s Oil and Nukes

Thousands of Brazilian military men have been very active. Brazil is holding military exercises ...

Brazil: For Some, Slavery Is the Only Option

It is estimated that between 25 and 40 thousand workers live under slave-like conditions ...