A Mere 1.5% of Arab Exports Go to Brazil and South America

Commercial transactions between South America and the Arab countries are still quite limited. South America accounts for 3.5% of what the Arabs buy from abroad. And only 1.5% of what the 22 Arab League countries export is destined for South American markets.

A large share of this business is concentrated in the hands of Brazil and Argentina, affirms Michel Alaby, secretary-general of the Arab-Brazilian Chamber of Commerce and president of the Association of Brazilian Companies for Market Integration (Adebim).


Last year Brazil exported US$ 4.03 billion to the Arabs – 46% more than in 2003 and equivalent to 4.1% of Brazil’s total exports.


Argentina earned US$ 2.1 billion last year from its sales to the Arab world, 32% more than the US$ 1.6 billion obtained in 2003 and equivalent to 6.5% of Argentina’s total exports.


The remaining amount of Arab purchases was partitioned among the other South American countries.


“The two countries’ export portolios are nearly identical,” Alaby observes. The common list is led by products such as soybeans, corn, powdered milk, beef, steel, shoes, soy proteins, and wheat.


Brazil also exports coffee, sugar, chicken, ore, paper, and furniture. The principal markets for both countries’ products were Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Egypt, Morocco, and Algeria.


The proportion is very different for imports. In 2004 Brazil acquired the equivalent of US$ 4.1 billion of the US$ 5.5 billion in merchandise sold by the Arab countries to South America.


Argentina spent only US$ 59 million in imports from that region (as against US$ 35 million in 2003).


The Argentinean shopping list includes petroleum by-products, phosphates, fertilizer components, and Egyptian cotton.


The leading items imported by Brazil are petroleum (75%), diesel oil, and petrochemical products.


Alaby points out that Brazil and Argentina are the only South American countries with Arab Chambers of Commerce, which have stimulated business. In the other South American countries, exchanges between the regions are brokered by the foreign offices.


Agência Brasil

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

PT Blames Brazilian Scandal on Lies from the Right

In a document entitled, “In Defense of the PT, Ethics and Democracy,” the board ...

US Pilots Association Urges Brazil to Release American Pilots

The Allied Pilots Association (APA), collective bargaining agent for the 13,000 pilots of American ...

Paraní¡, Brazil, Promotes Seminar to Boost Its Overseas Sales

The state of Paraná, in the South of Brazil, is promoting the 1st Seminar ...

Brazil’s Underpayment of Energy Is Strangling Paraguay

Fernando Lugo, Paraguay's President elect and Uruguayan President Tabare Vazquez agreed to work jointly ...

Brazil Blasts US and Casts Doubt It Will Buy American Fighter Planes

Brazilian Defense minister, Nelson Jobim, told reporters this Friday, November 6, that the dispute ...

Follow the Leader

A Lula victory will allow Brazil, in alliance with some of the U.S.’s adversaries, ...

Brazilian President Is Favorite of Voters, But She Could Lose in a Runoff

The first poll conducted after the death of presidential candidate Eduardo Campos (PSB) shows ...

Brazilian housewife Rosanita Nery dos Santos killed, cut and fried husband

Brazilian Who Chopped and Fried Husband May Have Been Ordered by Voodoo Priestess

Why did Brazilian Rosanita Nery dos Santos, 47, chopped her husband in over 100 ...

Brazil Opens Technology Center in Africa

The opening of a Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa) office in Africa is going ...

“Wonderful Meeting of Minds,” Says Obama About Meeting with Brazil’s Lula

US President, Barack Obama, after his first meeting with Brazil's President, Luiz Inácio Lula ...