Brazil Spends 8% of GDP in Communications, But It’s Still Too Little

Between 1998 and 2004, the countries of Latin America advanced in the field of information technology, but there are still chasms to be bridged.

This information was provided by João Carlos Ferraz, director of Productive and Entrepreneurial Development of the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), and is part of a study conducted by the organ.


According to the study, in terms of stationary telephones per 100 inhabitants, the number in Latin America rose from 0.20 in 1998 to 0.30 in 2004. The number of cell phones per 100 inhabitants in the region grew from 16 to 45 during the period.


In terms of Internet users per 100 thousand inhabitants, Latin America went from 0.07 to 0.28, and the number of Internet users per stationary telephone increased from 32 to 90.


The conclusion, Ferraz said, is that Latin American countries are changing, that is, the region’s developing countries are seeking means and initiatives to promote digital and social inclusion, but they still run up against the problem of income, which is small for the purchase of these more sophisticated technological goods.


The ratio between per capita income and spending on telephone services shows that, in percentage terms, Brazil is similar to countries like France and the Netherlands, for example.


“It’s just that the 8% of the GDP that Brazil spends on information and communications technology represents an average per capita outlay of US$ 600 to US$ 700 on ICT (information and communications technology), while in France these expenditures come to US$ 2.5 thousand for each inhabitant.”


Since yesterday, the forms of convergence in the region to make it easier for the population to have access to the new technologies are being debated at the Gloria Hotel, in Rio, during the Latin American and Caribbean Ministerial Conference.


The meeting is in preparation for the second phase of the World Summit on the Society of Information, which will be held in Tunisia in November. The Conference is being organized by the Brazilian government, with advisory support from the ECLAC.


Agência Brasil

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil to Teach World How to Fight Corruption

The United Nations will make use of Brazil’s experience in fighting municipal corruption as ...

Brazilian Fruit Exports Get Push and Money from Government

Brazil’s Export Promotion Agency (Apex – Brasil) and the Brazilian Fruit Institute (Ibraf) concluded ...

Brazil Accuses the Rich of Invading International Waters to Fish

Brazil plans to submit at the meeting of the World Trade Organization (WTO),a proposal ...

Security at Brazil’s Universal Church Threatens Journalist

Brazilian photojournalist Luiz Carlos Gomes, of Brazil's largest and arguably most influential daily newspaper, ...

It’s Been Ten Years Since Banks Had So Much Profit in Brazil

After a very good year in 2004, the biggest banks in Brazil have done ...

Having Found a Scapegoat for World Cup Loss Brazilians Are Back to Partying

I’ve read there are some Brazilians who don’t like the World Cup, which is ...

Chevron Expected to Pay US$ 100 Million in Fines for Spilling Oil Off Rio’s Coast

Brazil’s National Petroleum Agency (ANP), the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Natural Resources (IBAMA) ...

Brazil Ready to Retaliate If US Doesn’t Stop Cotton Subsidies

The Brazilian Minister of Agriculture, Roberto Rodrigues, says he considers noncompliance by the US ...

Syria and Jordan Interested in Importing Food from Brazil

The director-general at the department of food purchases of the Syrian government, Mohsen Abdel ...

Lula Accused of Following on Chavez’s Steps in Dealing with Brazilian Press

Brazilian president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s comments on freedom of the press are ...