Brazils Says Environment Will Guide Its Next Budget

Brazil’s interim Minister of Environment, Claudio Langone, says that one of the biggest challenges faced by Brazil is to incorporate environmental concerns with the country’s development strategy.

In his view, one of the outcomes of the 2nd National Environmental Conference should be a recommendation along these lines. Over 1,500 people are expected in Brasí­lia to discuss the theme, "Integrated environmental policy and sustainable natural resource use," during four days.

"There will certainly be an orientation in the sense of deepening the process of incorporating the environmental dimension into Brazil’s development strategies, so that we can begin a new phase in which the decision-making process involving new development options will incorporate the environmental dimension," Langone argues.

According to the interim Minister, the government has decided to let the environmental question also serve as a guideline in planning the country’s development.

"One of the most important aspects, which is being treated in conjunction with the Ministry of Planning, is that the government has already decided that the next PPA – Pluriannual Plan – which is the cornerstone of government planning policy in Brazil, particularly when it comes to infrastructure – will use the tool of strategic environmental evaluation as a decision-making instrument. This represents a very significant advance."

In Langone’s view, if Brazil fails to perceive the importance of the environmental issue as something basic, "it will be losing a great historical chance."

"There are three countries in the world today that have the chance to enter the bloc of the developed countries," he remarks. "They are Brazil, India, and China. And, in the environmental area, Brazil has incomparable advantages over India and China.

"We need the savvy to avail ourselves of these opportunities, which are not solely opportunities for political insertion in the global context but, most of all, for economic insertion."

The interim Minister observes that in terms of the environment, Brazil’s standards of technological progress and knowledge are similar to those in the world’s principal developed countries.

"In Brazil we don’t face the possibility of disasters like the one that occurred in China recently, where an 80-kilometer long benzene spill appeared in a river that supplies water to a population of 3 million people," he believes.

"In Brazil this would be unthinkable due to the level of technological progress and security possessed by Brazilian industry."

In order for the country to introduce the environmental factor in its development strategies, it is necessary to have a medium and long-term vision, according to Langone.

"Brazil must abandon the craze of short-run thinking and resume thinking in terms of the medium and long run, because every time your thinking is limited to the short run, the environment loses."

Agência Brasil

Tags:

You May Also Like

Still No Explanation for Death at Sea of Thousands of Cattle Shipped from Brazil

The Brazilian Association of Livestock Exporters (Abeg) believes that the death of at least ...

Brazilian Food Giant Sadia Beefs Up Old Plant with US$ 79 Million Investment

Sadia's old plant in Toledo, in the southern Brazilian state of Paraná, which received ...

Defending Brazil’s 1 Million Dam Victims

Brazil’s Movement of Dam Victims (MAB), as the name itself expresses, is a social ...

Kyly, Brazil’s Cool Kid Clothes Maker Looking for Hot Countries

The company Malhas Kyly, from the southern Brazilian state of Santa Catarina, specialized in ...

Developing Countries Get Brazilian College Scholarships

Citizens from all over the developing world can apply for scholarships in masters and ...

Brazil’s Foreign Trade Surplus Grows 30% in Semester to US$ 22.712 Billion

Brazilian exports yielded US$ 2.001 billion on the fourth week of July and imports, ...

Brazil: Ronaldo and Lula Put an End to “You’re-Fat/You-Drink-Too-Much” Spat

Brazil’s sports minister visited the team’s training camp on Saturday carrying a message from ...

Brazil: For Some, Slavery Is the Only Option

It is estimated that between 25 and 40 thousand workers live under slave-like conditions ...

Brazil: A Family for Each Street Kid

British Mick Pease is pushing the boundaries of childcare in Brazil. Says he, "The ...

Bovespa, in São Paulo, Brazil's key stock index

Brazil and China: Two Places Where Stocks Are Jumping Crazy

In its latest issue Money and Markets discusses why Brazil, India, China (three of ...