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Brazil Gets Australia’s Backing for UN Security Council Seat

The Australian Foreign Affairs Minister, Alexander Downer, declared that he is in favor of Brazilian participation as a permanent member of the United Nations (UN) Security Council.

According to the Australian Minister, reform of the Council is necessary to bring the organization abreast of today’s world. Downer was in the Ministry of Foreign Relations, in Brasí­lia, Wednesday, January 4.

"I believe the reform is necessary. The international community should press for this to happen, because we require a Council that represents the world as it is nowadays. The world is not the same as in 1945 [the year in which the UN was founded]. That is why I defend the entry of Brazil, Japan, and an African country, because that’s the way the world is now," Downer said.

The Brazilian minister of Foreign Relations, Celso Amorim, observed that the two countries share certain viewpoints. "Regarding the international agenda, I would say that our perspectives on the United Nations and multilateralism, including the need to reform the Security Council as well as other UN bodies, are very similar."

According to the Brazilian Minister, expanding the Security Council could be a form of democratizing the UN. "It is important for the reforms to be made in such a way as to make the UN more democratic. Criticisms are sometimes made, even concerning Security Council reform, that countries are after more privileges. That is not the case. Expanding the number of countries with seats on the Security Council is one of the ways to enlarge democratic spaces," he affirms.

As for the UN’s role in current international conflicts, the Australian minister said that the organization will not resolve all the problems but that it should protect lives.

"There is an awareness on the part of the member countries that a modicum of responsibility exists. We know that the UN will not resolve everything; countries, too, must deal with their problems, and the cooperation is important," he affirmed.

In Amorim’s view, the two countries have acted positively and cooperated in the solution of other disputes. "Australia played a significant role in East Timor, and Brazil played an important part in Angola and now in Haiti."

Amorim went on to say that Brazil has acted with forthrightness in the area of human rights. "In the case of human rights, it was Brazil, for example, that proposed a resolution in the Human Rights Commission stating that racism is incompatible with democracy."

Agência Brasil

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  • Show Comments (3)

  • Ben Garves

    Brzil IS Balanced Power
    Brazil, as the fifth largest nation in the world, has a right to a strong foothold in world politics. If the views of more than 180 million people cannot be expressed, especially by such a politically even-keeled country, than we will end upt with more problems and worse problems than Iraq. It is supression and racism that causes terrorism, and brazil is a steadfast nation, internal problems or not. I support a reform of one of the UN’s most important councils for representation from not only every continent, but every ethnicity. This is another medium for which people can settle their differences peacefully.

  • Guest

    If Brazil says that :
    ….. racism is incomptaible with democracy then Brazil is not a democracy by brazilian definitions.

  • Guest

    Brazil is not a superpower !
    Neither economically, politically or militarily.

    Your obsessional dreams of becoming a pernament seat member will remain a dream for years to come.

    Concerning other International disputes, Angola was a small problem and Haiti is not at war, from what I know.
    Should every country that participated in one or two International disputes be a permanent security member of the UN ?

    Then there should be a minimum of 150 permanent UN security seats, as the vast majority of countries participated in small International disputes.

    Finally on Human rights, proposing good resolutions are welcomed. But why are they not applied first in your own country ?

    You can just refer to International Agencies reports and even the Brazilian ones.
    On Human Rights issues you are not very well ranked. Reality is even that you are badly ranked.

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