Brazil’s Nuke Program Is Step Backward, Says Greenpeace

Greenpeace, one of the world’s best known NGOs, calls Brazil’s new uranium enrichment factory in Resende, Rio de Janeiro, a step backward.

The factory, built at a cost of US$ 172 million to make Brazil independent of enriched uranium imports that costs US$  16 million annually, should go into operation in the next few days.

Guilherme Leonardi, the coordinator for nuclear energy at Greenpeace, says Brazil is investing in a technology that many countries are abandoning. Leonardi disagrees with experts who say that nuclear energy is clean.

"Inevitably nuclear energy produces nuclear waste. And when you are dealing with nuclear energy there is always a risk of an accident at various points in the nuclear fuel cycle – in the processing of nuclear fuel, the generation of energy or in disposing of the nuclear waste," he says.

Leonardi goes on to say that many countries are rethinking the nuclear energy alternative. They are deciding against new nuclear power plants, he explains, which is what Brazil should do.

Greenpeace says that Brazil spent US$ 2.58 billion on the construction of its first nuclear power plant, Angra I. And that the second power plant, Angra II, cost US$ 6 billion.

Agência Brasil

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

A Vote to Cost Up to US$ 12 in Brazil

The Brazilian Election Commission (Tribunal Superior Eleitoral) (TSE), in a preliminary estimate, says that ...

Brazil Consolidates Leadership in Argentina Oil Investing US$ 2 Bi

Brazilian state-run oil company Petrobras's Argentine unit Petrobras EnergÀ­a SA "plans to invest more ...

Brazil's Abimaq

Brazil Adopts Cost-Reduction and Productivity-Increase Plan for Industries

A technological improvement program most of it paid by Brazil's government utilizing specialized technicians ...

Brazilian Airline Gol Gets Prize and US$ 50 Million Loan

Brazilian leading business magazine Exame has awarded Gol Airlines with its Melhores e Maiores ...

The Dream Is Dead. Most Brazilians No Longer Trust Lula.

Most Brazilians (52%) no longer trust their President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. A ...

Brazilians Will Decide Future of Mercosur when Voting for New President

As the pro-tempore chair of Mercosur in the last leg of his eight years ...

Humberto de Campos: An Old Brazilian Poet Gets New Life in Print

The third edition of "In the shade of the date trees: oriental tales" (À€ ...

Brazil Rebuffs Amnesty and Says It’s on the Right Path

The national secretary of Public Safety in the Ministry of Justice, Luiz Fernando Corrêa, ...

Brazil Expects Foreign Tourists to Spend More than Ever this Year

According to Brazil’s Central Bank, foreigners visiting Brazil spent US$ 314 million, in September, ...

No Gas, Brazil Tells Argentina. But You’ll Get a Little Electricity

Brazilian President, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, said this Saturday, February 23, in Buenos ...