One Million Brazilians Have Been Displaced by Dams

March 14 was International Day of Action Against Dams and for Rivers, Water and Life. The International Movement Against Dams reports that there are 800,000 dams around the world which have caused the dislocation of some 80 million people.

In Brazil, according to the organization, since the 1970s a total of one million people have been displaced by dam construction.

International Day of Action Against Dams was commemorated in Brazil with demonstrations by representatives of social movements and environmental activists in the state of Rondônia.

The demonstrators protested the construction of two hydroelectric power plants on the Rio Madeira (the plants are known as Jirau and Santo Antônio).

The protests were led by an umbrella group known as the Forum for Debates on Rondônia Energy which congregates, among others, an energy research group at the local federal university (Grupo de Pesquisa em Energia Renovável e Sustentável da Universidade Federal de Rondônia) (Unir), the Indian Missionary Council (Conselho Indigenista Missionário) (Cimi) and the Land Pastoral Commission (Comissão Pastoral da Terra) (CPT) [which are both linked to the Catholic church], an environmental NGO "Canindé," an Amazon region work group (Grupo de Trabalho Amazônico) (GTA), a rubber tapper union (Organização dos Seringueiros de Rondônia) (OSR), the NGO Rio Terra and the Victims of Dams Movement (Movimento dos Atingidos por Barragens) (MAB).

The Forum has drawn up a list of problems the construction of the two power plants will cause. Among them: loss of areas of historical interest, the need to resettle 2,000 riverside inhabitants who do not have land deeds and will face burdensome difficulties in obtaining any indemnity besides losing their livelihood (they are fishermen), along with the negative impact on the Madeira River, its ecology and the fauna and flora in the region.

However, on the other hand, the Madeira River project is an important element in the Brazilian government’s development plans. With the construction of the two power plants the river will be navigable, making it possible to harvest soy grown in the Central-West region of Brazil and then transport it by river and highways across western Brazil and through Bolivia and Peru to the Pacific Ocean for export to Asia.

Agência Brasil

Tags:

You May Also Like

New Jobs Way Down in Brazil

In May, a total of 212,450 jobs in Brazil’s formal market were created, reports ...

Brazilian Indians Dealt Setback by Government

The Itaty indigenous land, which is more known as the Morro dos Cavalos land, ...

Brazil’s Petrobras Buys All Shell’s Operations in Uruguay and Paraguay

Petrobras announced Thursday, December 21, that it had paid US$ 140 million for a ...

Brazil’s Airline Gol Vows to Cut Carbon Dioxide by 20%

Brazilian airline Gol plans a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions per ASK (available ...

Brazil’s Credit Rating Upgrade Felt More Like a Downgrade

Brazil government debt prices eased slightly after a rating agency upgraded Brazil’s credit but ...

The Shock & the Dream

By Brazzil Magazine THE POWER OF KNOWLEDGE The first wonder of the end of ...

Boeing Tragedy: Aviation Leaders Beg Brazil to Not Indict Air Controllers

Several international aviation organizations including the  Flight Safety Foundation and the National Business Aviation ...

Dilma Running for Brazil’s Presidency as National Candidate Against São Paulo

Brazil’s nationwide elections on October, 3 will see more than 130 million voters choose ...

Fallen Brazil’s Chief of Staff Says his Hands Are Clean

José Dirceu, in a speech announcing his resignation as Presidential Chief of Staff, declared ...

Twice Now Polls Have Shown Rousseff Ahead of Serra in Brazil’s Presidential Election

Brazil’s former chief of staff Dilma Rousseff, Brazil’s ruling Workers’ Party presidential candidate, has ...