Brazil Adopts New Friendlier Rules for Biodiversity Studies

Brazil makes it easier to study biodiversity The Brazilian government has announced a new system that will issue licenses to collect biological material for scientific research and teaching purposes more quickly. Previously, licenses for the collection of plants, animals and other biological materials in Brazil took up to two years to be processed in the most complicated cases.

The new Biodiversity Authorization and Information System (Sisbio) allows licenses to be granted up to 45 days after application via the Internet.

According to the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Natural Resources (IBAMA) – the organization responsible for Sisbio – the simplest cases could be resolved within seven days.

However, applications will require more detailed evaluation if they involve studies in conservation areas or caves, species at risk of extinction, the import or export of biological material and collection of vertebrates exceeding a set quota.

New rules have also been established to collect, capture, transport, receive and send Brazilian biological material through other countries. Scientists say the previous licensing system was too severe and 'criminalized' scientific activities.

According to Marcos Tavares, from the University of São Paulo Zoological Museum and a member of the Brazilian Society for the Progress of Science, IBAMA's permission was required for a teacher to gather species in a field with students.

"The new system represents a huge improvement due to its rapidity and the transparency offered – which will provoke a positive impact in scientific studies," Tavares said.

Scientists will eventually be able to use Sisbio to access satellite images of potential research areas and gauge research activity in areas so they can better plan their research.

Sisbio, established March 2, is the result of more than a year of debate between IBAMA and the Sisbio Technical Advisory Committee, composed of government members and representatives of scientific associations.

Rômulo Mello, IBAMA's director of Fauna and Fishing Resources, says the new system reconciles the interests of both scientific community and IBAMA.

"IBAMA's goal is to allow scientific knowledge improvement with the smallest environmental impact possible and to inhibit biopiracy," said Mello.

SciDev.Net

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

A Brazilian Ant With a Christian Message for the Whole World

Smilingüido is an ant that lives with his friends in the anthill of the ...

Brazil: Lula Vetoes Law Intended as Social Shock

Recently, President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva vetoed a set of measures approved by ...

This Lebanese-Brazilian Built a Little Food Empire

It is 10 o’clock in the morning. Aldemir Abdala runs from one side to ...

Tourism Grows into US$ 4 Billion Industry in Brazil

Since the creation of Brazil’s Ministry of Tourism in 2003, sector revenue has practically ...

Senator Gives First Salvo on Brazil’s Disarmament Campaign

Today the president of the Brazilian Senate, Renan Calheiros from the Alagoas PMDB party, ...

5,000 Women a Year Die from Botched Abortions in Brazil. Blame It on the Church

It should come as no surprise that a country whose population is 74% Roman ...

Brazil Loses 4.5 Million Tons of Soybeans to Rust

Brazil’s Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, and Supply’s Department of Plant Health and Inspection is evaluating ...

Brazil Prisons Get 187 Young Adults Every Day

The latest study out by the Brazilian Ministry of Justice shows that every hour, ...

Fable

—I never make a mistake. —Then it was the hooded ones’ mistake. —Not possible. ...

Brazil Only Loses to Chile in High Cost of Living in South America

Chile, Brazil and Uruguay have the highest cost of living in Latinamerica according to ...