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Another Brazilian Dies from Yellow Fever and Foreigners Are Told to Get Vaccine

Febre amarela, yellow fever in Brazil Foreign travelers to Brazil who intend to visit rural and forested areas are being advised by the WHO (World Health Organization) to get yellow fever vaccination. Three quarters of Brazil are located in these areas. Yellow fever is a viral disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes

A Brazilian patient who was in a list of 17 people being investigated for yellow fever by Brazil's Health Ministry died Monday night, January 14, in Brazilian capital Brasí­lia.

From 26 suspected cases of yellow fever in the whole country, six were ruled out and three cases have now been confirmed. From these, two have died and one is in recovery.

Three health agents' teams have started today to reinforce vaccination against the disease in the rural areas of the Federal District.

A 44-year-old man admitted to a hospital in Taguatinga, 20 kilometers from downtown Brasí­lia is another suspect case. The man is in serious condition being kept alive with hemodialysis and a respirator. He wasn't vaccinated against the disease and had spent the New Year's celebration in a ranch in Abadiânia, Goiás state.

All cases of yellow fever that were confirmed or just suspicious were of the wild kind, meaning that the infection occurred in rural areas and not in the city where yellow fever is supposed to have disappeared since 1942.

In Cascavel, in the southern state of Paraná, 140 health agents have been looking for mosquito focuses in the city's Zoo since 10 monkeys died there. The place has been closed to the public.

Reassurance

Brazil faces no risk of a yellow fever epidemic, despite an outbreak of the disease, Health Minister, José Gomes Temporão said this last weekend. However the health ministry asked a Rio-based foundation to double production of a yellow fever vaccine from 15 million to 30 million doses in 2008.

"The situation is absolutely under control," Temporão told the Brazilian population. "There is no need for mass vaccination, no epidemic. What we're doing is adequate."

Neighboring Uruguay and Paraguay have declared a state of emergency in border areas while Argentina faces a growing demand for vaccines given the significant influx of tourists planning to spend their holidays along the Brazilian coast.

The death of a visiting Spaniard who purchased land in Goiás, is believed to have been caused by the disease according to the symptoms.

The minister underlined that Brazil has no registered cases of urban contagion since 1942 and all later outbreaks have occurred in rural risk areas and among people not vaccinated. Temporão recommended that Brazilians traveling to rural areas be vaccinated ten days in advance and pointed out that no cases have been reported for years along the country's long coastline.

The vaccine immunity lasts ten years therefore those who were vaccinated before 1999 should have a repeat.

According to the Brazilian Health ministry in January 3.23 million doses were distributed, three times the 961.000 average of 2007. However Temporão indicated that the number of cases has been "gradually" falling since 2003.

While yellow fever has been largely eradicated, Brazil was last year wracked by a wave of dengue fever that spread across Latin America and the Caribbean. Some 438,949 cases and 98 deaths were reported in the first seven months of 2007 in Brazil alone.

Bzz/MP

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  • Show Comments (15)

  • Maks

    Mass Vaccination
    Sounds like an episode of X-Files…

  • Shellly

    Simpleton
    [quote]On a more conservative note – what’s the reality with respect to yellow fever potential for those in / touring Rio De Janeiro, Espirito Santo, and southern half of Minas Gerais states including forested areas?[/quote]

    Controlling mosquito population is not simple as it may look. First, we need to look at the location of the outbreak. Does it have a lot of forest cover? How open it is? Some of you may know that with deforestation, vast soils which were kept cool by canopy coverage gets to “see” a lot of sunlight. This is bad for areas of the Amazon and the Central of Brazil. However, in urban areas the problem can multiply even faster than in remote areas. In the favelas, where people live in unhealthy conditions and very close to each other, this could be deadly. The best way to avoid such outbreaks is to leave the forest alone and teach people to regularly check for water collecting around tires or gutters. Also, water containers need to be closed, as a drop of water can have millions of baby mosquito.

    Here is a report about urban outbreak of yellow fever in Africa. We have similar conditions in Rio and other favelas. So in essence, it could happen in Rio, Minas or Sao Paulo.

    http://www.who.int/csr/disease/yellowfev/urbanoutbreaks/en/index.html

  • João da Silva

    Gringo
    [quote]And the tinfoil hat award this week goes to……[/quote]

    You don’t have to get aggressive towards your fellow citizen 😉

  • Gringo

    [quote]If you have been doing your homework, the actual agenda of the WHO or Dr. WHO is to have everyone vaccinated, while never questioning what is in the vaccines. For those not familiar with the WHO spreading disease through vaccine programs since the 70’s check the research out.[/quote]

    Muuuu hoooo haaaaaa haaaaaa. And the tinfoil hat award this week goes to……

  • BrianMichael

    If you have been doing your homework, the actual agenda of the WHO or Dr. WHO is to have everyone vaccinated, while never questioning what is in the vaccines. For those not familiar with the WHO spreading disease through vaccine programs since the 70’s check the research out. For the author of this article and all others interested check out Alan Watt at http://www.cuttingthroughthematrix.com and for transcripts in Portuguese go to http://www.alanwattsentientsentinel.eu

  • Kess

    ”On a more conservative note – what’s the reality with respect to yellow fever potential for those in / touring Rio De Janeiro, Espirito Santo, and southern half of Minas Gerais states including forested areas?”

    TRANSOU – DanÀƒ§ou

  • bo

    [quote]I’m still more afraid of the average motorist then some remote and infected mosquito.[/quote]

    And you should be. Of the thousands of brazilians that I’ve met in my decade here I’ve only met ONE that actually knew how to drive!

  • Simpleton

    Agentina’s Such Worse than Brasileira’s?
    Even the rich punks from Bahia touring south have their women drive them. Do those from down south such that much more?

    On a more conservative note – what’s the reality with respect to yellow fever potential for those in / touring Rio De Janeiro, Espirito Santo, and southern half of Minas Gerais states including forested areas?

  • João da Silva

    Ch.c
    [quote]” Argentina faces a growing demand for vaccines given the significant influx of tourists planning to spend their holidays along the Brazilian coast. “[/quote]

    Mon ami, the best thing that the Argentine tourists can do is not to come to the (Southern) Brazilian coast to avoid getting this Yellow fever and instead head towards ZÀƒ¼rich (I am sure you wouldn’t like them to have in Geneva). Man, lemme tell ya something. This afternoon I was sandwiched between two cars from Argentina. The one behind overtook me on a curve and tried to overtake his “Hermano” in front of me and at the last moment, he saw a huge truck and did not have enough space to squeeze in between me and his “Hermano”. I had to a dangerous maneuver to save him.

    I don’t know who gets these tourists first. Yellow fever or their reckless driving. Compared to the Argentine drivers, we are very orderly and law abiding while we drive.

  • ch.c.

    because……..in contradiction with………
    ” Foreign travelers to Brazil who intend to visit rural and forested areas are being advised by the WHO (World Health Organization) to get yellow fever vaccination. Three quarters of Brazil are located in these areas. Yellow fever is a viral disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes “

    To my knowledge Rural and Forested areas mean in the Amazon as one commentator said.
    Not the Brazilian coast.

    😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉

  • ch.c.

    To Joao
    ” Argentina faces a growing demand for vaccines given the significant influx of tourists planning to spend their holidays along the Brazilian coast. “

    Another Brazilian truth, reality and proof…..of how UNSMART……the majority of the supposed educated minority brazilians are !!!!!!

    😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉 😀 😉

  • João da Silva

    Ch.c
    [quote]could be killed by a criminal ,by car accident, yellow fever, dengue, airplane crash or lack of hospital care !!!

    Brazil is quite dangerous.[/quote]

    I must lodge my protest for not including the “Native Indians” with their poisonous arrows waiting for unsuspecting visitors like you as another perilous group. Do you think that they are easy push overs?

    Hope that during your visit to Alagoas, you didn’t catch anything 😉

  • ch.c.

    Deaths in Brazil !!!!!!
    could be killed by a criminal ,by car accident, yellow fever, dengue, airplane crash or lack of hospital care !!!

    Brazil is quite dangerous.

  • João da Silva

    Gringo
    [quote]Snicker as you may.[/quote]

    Thanks for allowing me to do so 😛

  • Gringo

    This has always been advised
    This has always been advised. I’m sure folks are being reminded MORE now, but it is always recommended that people traveling to Brazil get the vaccine. Actually, some nations like Cameroon will not let you enter their country if you have been to Brazil and were not vaccinated.

    I’m still more afraid of the average motorist then some remote and infected mosquito. Nothing to worry about and I am sure the health Ministry is on the case. Snicker as you may.

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