Rapidinhas

TV Naked assets

Galisteu couldn’t resist taking her clothes off

Naked Adriane Galisteu
The contract’s clause was very clear: no nude scenes. But TV Manchete’s
director Walter Avancini went ahead anyway and asked model-turned-actress
Adriane Galisteu, 23, to bare her breasts in Xica da Silva,
the upcoming made-for-TV mini-series, right in the very first scene. Galisteu,
who can’t say no to a lustful lens, went a step further and ended up taking
the traditional totally-in-the-buff bath in the waterfall, a common plot
to save novelas (soap operas) with sagging ratings or, in this case,
a TV network nobody watches.
Adriane, who became famous for being the girlfriend of popular four-time
Formula 1 champion Ayrton Senna at the time of his death in 1994,
has managed to convert her fame into a multipath career, writing a best-seller
book, posing in the nude for $ 1 million for Brazilian Playboy,
endorsing products, and now embarking on an acting career.

 

Clara, the character she plays — she is the foster sister of Xica da
Silva, the black heroine from the title — was added to the show for marketing
reasons. She gets gang raped at the start of the mini-series which justifies
her deranged behavior making her wander through the fields, talk little
and walk bare-breasted covered only by white transparent lingerie. “All
for the art,” was the actress’s reaction to the need of also abandoning
depilation for the time being.

 


Around the bush

 

Carioca (native from Rio) singer Daniela Araújo,
20, was lost in Naxos on the Greek coast when a tall man in bermudas

offered to help. She didn’t like it though when he became a little
too cozy taking her hands between his and praising Brazil when she said
she was Brazilian. “I knew your pretty country when I was President
of the United States,” he commented. Fresh and liar to boot, Daniela
thought to herself. The old man was already leaving when it dawned upon
her that he was George Bush. In a hurry she then took a picture.
“Nobody would believe me otherwise,” she said. Back in Brazil,
the singer commented, “When he met me the guy seemed a dirty old man
and a little crazy, but then I sort of liked him.”

 


Brazilian papabile

 

The newest member of the Academia Brasileira de Letras (Brazilian Academy
of Letters) might also be the next Pope. Cardinal Lucas Moreira Neves,
president of the Conferência Nacional dos Bispos do Brasil (Brazil’s
National Conference of Bishops) was elected with 32 votes (there were five
blank votes and two members didn’t vote) to occupy seat no. 2 left open
by the death of writer Abgar Renault. Immortal Neves has been named
by the Washington Post, the London Times, and the Italian

Corriere Dela Sera, among other publications, as being a
strong candidate for the Holy See. Originally from the small town of São
João del Rey (ex-president Tancredo Neves was also born there)
in Minas Gerais, the Bahia’s cardinal, dismisses the thought of papacy:
“This rumor is in bad taste. His Holiness will still live many years
in order to continue his work.”

 


Wealth Can you spare
a billion?

 

Brazil made the latest Forbes‘ list of the 500 wealthiest people
on the planet – ten times. That’s double the number of Canadians and three
times more than the Argentineans on the roll. Among those Brazilians with
at least $1 billion, Antônio Ermírio de Moraes and
his family, who have built a fortune on cement, paper and aluminum, continue
to shine with an estimated wealth of $5.1 billion. There are only 39 other
billionaires in the world worth $5 billion or more, starting with Bill
Gates
and his 18 billion. Here are the Brazilian Midas and their fortunes
in billions of dollars:

1 – Antônio Ermírio de Moraes – 5.1
2 – Júlio Bozano – 2.5
3 – Roberto Marinho – 2.1
4 – Camargo Family – 2
5 – Roberto & Gabriel Andrade – 1.2

6 – Abílio Diniz – 1.2 (first time on the list)
7 – Luiz Alberto Garcia – 1.2 (first time on the list)
8 – Leon Feffer – 1.1
9 – Larragoiti Family – 1.1
10 – Norberto Odebrecht – 1.1

 


Abuse Yankee terror

 

Mistreatment of foreigners in US consulates all over the world is nothing
new. The silence of consular workers when faced with complaints is no novelty
either. To make a point, after trying in vain to get an audience with Edwin
Beffel
, the American consul in Rio, Celso Fontenelle, president
of Ordem dos Advogados do Brasil (OAB) — Brazil’s national bar association
— sent a letter to American President Bill Clinton. That was enough to
brew a domestic storm when the letter was made public. The document cites
several cases of people being humiliated by the Yankee uncivil servants.

Among them, sociologist Antônio Carlos Alkmim, who is finishing
a doctorate at the University of Michigan, and who was denied a visa and
removed by force by two marines when he asked to talk to someone in charge.
Painter Bonifácio Gomes da Costa, who had been invited to
exhibit his paintings in Miami was called a liar. When the worker said
she was going to do him a favor by granting the visa, Costa declined the
kindness. Elaine Barreiros, a Rio travel agent, compares the American
consulate to the emergency room of Hospital Miguel Couto, Rio’s main public
hospital: “People get cold sweats. It’s the same widespread uneasiness.”

 

 


Explosive malentendu

 

“It looks like a phone,” said Brazilian lawyer Jamil Abdelrazak
Abdala Abdo
, 31, traveling in first class, to the question of the flight
attendant who wanted to know which was his luggage, in the overhead compartment,
when the plane was ready to take off from Chicago’s O’Hare airport. To
the United Airlines attendant it sounded like, “It looks like a bomb.”
It was July 25. The TWA plane explosion and the Atlanta bombing were still
very fresh in everybody’s mind and no protest from Abdo convinced the attendant
that it was all a misunderstanding.
In came the pilot, and then the police. To complicate things the lawyerhad
been walking and doin light exercises while waiting in the airport. Together
with his Arab last name that made him even more of a suspect. The lawyer
was taken to the airport’s police station and left in a cold cell from
6 PM to midnight. Gravely ill, he had to be taken to an Intensive Care
Unit (ICU). Only then, did the police start to realize that they had made
a mistake. Notwithstanding, Abdo had to pay $100 in bail plus the $2,500
ICU bill. As for United, he says, “They’ve lost a first-class client.”

 


Beware the US crocs

 

Brazilian boy Alexandre Teixeira, 7, from São Paulo, was
almost eaten by an alligator last July 13. He was vacationing with his
parents not in the Amazon jungle or Mato Grosso’s Pantanal but a mere 50
km from Miami. Alexandre fell from his bicycle and slid into the Everglades
National Park’s swamp. He was attacked by an alligator mississipiensis
and only the prompt action of his parents prevented the worst from happening.
Hélio and Maria Odete Teixeira jumped in the water.
While the father forced the animal’s mandibles open, the mother pulled
her son from the anilmal’s mouth.
There was a moment of panic when the boy and the father submerged with
the crocodile. Alexandre was taken to the Miami’s Children Hospital, with
two broken vertebrae and a hemorrhaging lung. It was no consolation to
know that this was the first such accident since 1947. All is well now
and little Alexandre even went back to Florida at the invitation of Disney
World. And he learned his lesson: stay in Brazil if you don’t want to be
eaten alive.

 


Deadly sneeze

 

Thanks to the unfailing Carioca (from Rio) humor this winter’s
cold has been baptized with a memorable though a little morbid name. This
year’s cold attack was named Suzana. Suzana Marcolina da Silva,
28, was the woman found dead on the side of former president Fernando
Collor de Mello
‘s treasurer Paulo César Faria‘s dead
body. Police and preliminary investigations have concluded that Suzana
murdered PC

and then killed herself. To those who ask why the cold is called Suzana,
the Carioca answers: “Because it takes anyone to bed.”
This year’s strong virosis leaves people practically dead for a week or
more.

 


Music Sour smell of
success
Tiririca and his CD
Tiririca and his CD
Tiririca — whose root tiriri means to drag in Tupi, one
of the languages of the Brazilian Indians — is a hard-to-get-rid-of weed
common in cultivated fields in Brazil. To eradicate the Cyperus rotundus
is a mission close to impossible since its roots spread fast forming bulbs
that can start new plants. In Brazil, to be tiririca is slang for
‘to be furious’ too. That Tiririca (Francisco Everardo Oliveira
da Silva, 31) is also the name of the biggest musical sensation in the
country is more than appropriate. His “Florentina” took over
the airwaves and in two months, according to Sony Music, sold more than
200,000 copies.

 

The Cearense (from Ceará state) toothless clown who refuses to
get new teeth so he “won’t lose his identity” had been a big
hit with the children with catchy irreverent tunes filled with double entendres.
Now he was also turned into a cause célèbre and an instant
bestseller among adults since Carioca (from Rio) judge Flávia
Viveiros de Castro
ordered that the disc containing “Veja os Cabelos
Dela” (Look at Her Hair) be taken off stores’ shelves. Viveiros de
Castro accuses the composition of being racist. The judge’s action has
polarized the country. Many intellectuals, though they hate Tiririca’s
work have come to his rescue reminding us that some of Brazil’s classic
tunes have also made fun of blacks.
Lamartine Babo‘s, Carnaval hit song since 1932, for example, says
O teu cabelo não nega, mulata, porque és mulata
na cor, mas como a cor não pega, mulata, mulata quero teu amor.

(Your hair doesn’t deny it, mulatto girl, because your color is mulatto,
but since color doesn’t catch, mulatto girl, mulatto girl I want your love).
Here are the polemic lyrics, that the author says were inspired by his
own black wife, singer Rogéria Márcia.

 


Veja os Cabelos Dela

Tiririca

 

Veja, veja, veja
Os cabelos dela
Parece Bombril
De ariar panela
Quando ela passa
Me chama a atenção

Mas seus cabelos
Não têm jeito não
A sua catinga
Quase me desmaiou
Olha eu não agüento
O grande seu fedor
Veja, veja, veja
Os cabelos dela
Parece bombril

De ariar panela
Eu já mandei
Ela se lavar
Mas ela teimou
E não quis me escutar
Essa nega fede
Fede de lascar
Bicha fedorenta
Fede mais que um gambá

 


Look at Her Hair

 

Look, look, look
At her hair
It seems like a Brillo pad
For scouring pans
When she passes

She catches my eye
But her hair
Is hopeless
Her stench
All but made me faint
Look, I can’ t stand
Her big stink
Look, look, look
At her hair

It seems like a Brillo pad
For scouring pans
I’ve already ordered her
To take a bath
But she was stubborn
And didn’t want to listen to me
This Negress stinks
Stinks like hell
Stinky shrew

She stinks more than a skunk

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil’s Internet Surfer Population Reaches 39%

In a surprising result for many, the number of Brazilians who have access to ...

Lula’s Speech Pleases Moneymen and Brazil’s Market Soars

Latin American markets endured a mixed session, but Brazil helped brighten the region with ...

Brazil Has a Chance to Show Its Health Care Goods in the Middle East

Brazilian company Hospimetal, a maker of hospital equipment, made a series of contacts during ...

Feel-Good Sentiment in Brazil Boosts Market

Latin American markets finished mostly higher, led by a surge in Brazil as inflation ...

More Trade and Less Protectionism, Brazil’s Recipe to Save the World

Following a meeting Tuesday with visiting Uruguayan President Tabare Vazquez, Brazilian President Luiz Inácio ...

Where Did All the Blacks Go?

When I asked in Bahia a group of Brazilian school kids what race they ...

Numbers Show Indy 500 Has Become Brazilians’ Race to Lose

For years now I’ve been trumpeting the accomplishments of Brazilians at North America’s crown ...

Brazil’s Friboi Acquires Argentina’s Swift Armour

Friboi, a leading Brazilian meatpacker, has acquired a majority participation in Swift Armour the ...

Brazil Might Lose Its Savannah in 20 Years

Brazil will be celebrating this Saturday National Savannah Day. The date coincides with the final ...

Brazil Confident Job Market Will Expand

With the creation of 102,965 new jobs in March, formal employment in Brazil grew ...