• Categories
  • Archives

Child Labor Went Down in Brazil, But 5 Million Underage Workers Are Still Way Too Many

Child labor in Brazil One hundred and eleven years after Brazil abolished slavery, the number of workers deprived of their freedom is still huge. They raise cattle, produce charcoal, sugar cane or timber. Some of them, most undocumented Bolivians, work in basements of small apparel factories in São Paulo and other metropolis.

According to the latest official statistics, the country also counts at least 1.2 million young workers between the ages of 5 and 13 – even if Brazilian law forbids those under 14 to work. If you add teens up to 18 years-old, you will have more than 5 million underage Brazilians in the market place. A huge percentage of them receive no salary.

This number includes teens “adopted” informally to work as housekeepers and submitted to very long hours. It also includes many sexual workers. Brazil’s highway police recently identified more than 1,800 truck stops around the country where minors offer sexual services.

A report released in September by the US Department of Labor, aiming to shed lights on “exploitative working conditions in the production of goods” in 77 countries, concludes that there is fair evidence that several Brazilian industries are responsible for perpetrating these irregular labor practices.

But the report also acknowledges that the government “has taken an exemplary, multifaceted approach to the elimination of child and forced labor.” It has “improved its legislative framework, enforced these laws effectively, established targeted action plans to combat child labor, forced labor, and trafficking in persons”, among other initiatives.

Last October, Brazil and a few other countries signed an agreement to work together to eradicate child labor by 2020, with the support of the International Labor Organization.

The Brazilian government also created the so-called “Dirty List” (Lista Suja) of forced labor cases, including the names of companies and property owners who use workers under forced labor conditions.

In my former job, as a Social and Environmental risk analyst for Banco Real, one of the main financial institutions in the country, we wouldn’t offer credit to companies included in the Dirty List without promoting extensive auditing of their labor conditions and verifying their compliance to a series of laws.

There are, in fact, evidences that all these federal initiatives are pretty effective.

Between 2003 and 2008, almost 27 thousand people submitted to forced labor were released. Child labor has been steadily declining (in the early nineties, there were around 8 million underage workers in the country). One of the reasons is that the Brazilian economy and middle class are growing. Many families that had to find their kids a job now afford to keep them in school.

It is still not good enough. Civil society and the government have to increase their engagement in this combat against labor practices that are both shameful and deeply rooted.

Brazilian born, French citizen, married to an American, Regina Scharf is the ultimate globetrotter. She graduated in Biology and Journalism from USP (Universidade de São Paulo) and has worked for Folha de S. Paulo, Gazeta Mercantil and Veja magazine as well as Radio France Internationale. Since 2004 she has lived in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the US. She authored or co-authored several books in Portuguese on environmental issues and was honored by the 2002 Reuters-IUCN Press award for Latin America and by the 2004 Prêmio Ethos. You can read more by her at Deep Brazilwww.deepbrazil.com.

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazilian Task Force Ends Malaria in Peru and Colombia Border

Known as the Vale do Javari Task Force, and coordinated by Brazil’s National Health ...

Enrique V. Iglesias

Brazil Can Learn with Iglesias How to Take the Leap into the Future

Although younger than the Argentine Raúl Presbisch, the Brazilian Celso Furtado and the Chilean ...

Brazil’s Capoeira: Alive and Kicking in London

Some come into capoeira class, convinced they are about to learn a Brazilian version ...

China Becomes Brazil’s Third Biggest Trade Partner Behind US and Argentina

The executive secretary at Brazil’s Ministry of Development, Ivan Ramalho, declared that total bilateral ...

Brazil and Tunisia to End Visa Requirements Between Both Nations

The need for greater cultural interaction between Brazil and Tunisia was one of the ...

Brazilian Executive Jet Phenom 100 Passes FAA Test in Texas

Brazilian Embraer's first Phenom 100 customers have successfully passed the practical test with the ...

Brazilian Indians Say Only Property Rights Will Make Them Feel Secure

The nutritional conditions of Brazil’s indigenous peoples were discussed Wednesday, June 29, at a ...

Amazon Countries Gather in Brazil But Can’t Reach Concrete Proposal

Gathered in Brazil, nine nations in the Amazon region have called on rich countries ...

Murder of US Nun Deeply Shakes Brazil

Dorothy Stang, 76, a Catholic missionary from the US has been murdered Saturday by ...

Brazil to Export US$ 2 Billion in Software

President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva reaffirmed that, until 2007, Brazil intends to export ...