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Brazil Loses US$ 230 Billion a Year or 1/3 of GDP to Piracy

The secretary of Economic Rights in Brazil’s Ministry of Justice, Daniel Goldberg, reaffirmed, Thursday, November 10, that piracy in Brazil is responsible for economic losses on the order of 30% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

By this calculation, last year’s losses amounted to around US$ 230 billion. For this reason, Goldberg argued, the campaign against counterfeit merchandise is one of the priorities of President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s Administration.

Goldberg, who participated this week in the Second Cycle of Studies of Regulation, in Rio de Janeiro, said that, besides the Federal Police and the Federal Revenue agency, the government possesses a Council to Combat Piracy and a Consumer Protection and Defense Department – all of them with the mission of suppressing the black market.

He said that the National Consumer Protection System (Sistema Nacional de Defesa do Consumidor), which can be accessed on the Internet, provides information on counterfeit products that represent safety hazards to the population.

Goldberg explained that the information is updated on-line with the help of ten state Consumer Protection agencies (Procons), as the list of counterfeit products grows daily.

According to the secretary, the most flagrant falsification is of CDs, DVDs, clothes, and sneakers. Nevertheless, there is also piracy involving goods like eyeglasses, lenses, medicines, and, most recently, scalpels.

"It is recognized internationally that there have never been as many efforts to combat piracy as the ones implemented in Lula’s Administration. Piracy is one of the priorities of Federal Police action, and the government created the Council to Combat Piracy as a priority strategic organ of interministerial coordination," he added.

Agência Brasil

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  • Show Comments (2)

  • Guest

    Mister D
    You don`t fight organized crime like this without fighting corupted politicians.
    Simply because it wouldn`t survive without them. And for all those suffering, I really don`t think it`s fun.

  • Guest

    WHAAAAAAAT ????
    “Brazil Loses US$ 230 Billion a Year or 1/3 of GDP to Piracy
    The secretary of Economic Rights in Brazil’s Ministry of Justice, Daniel Goldberg, reaffirmed, Thursday, November 10, that piracy in Brazil is responsible for economic losses on the order of 30%.

    The politicians take what’s left behind. The 70%. Ain’t that fun??

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